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Aging Teeth

Yatheendradas C.k. at 03:14 PM - Apr 14, 2019 ( ) Views: 100

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Aging Teeth
We spend a significant part of our lives eating, chewing, and biting into something. Our teeth, owing to their natural strength, can take this entire load; however, this wear and tear, and age can affect your teeth. Given below are some possible conditions that you might face as you age and ways to prevent them.
Acid Erosion
All the sugars and starch we consume through foods are the biggest threats to our teeth. These carbohydrates cause the bacteria in our mouths to produce acids, which in turn eat away and corrode the enamel of our teeth. This leads to creation of tiny pits and craters where tooth decay can commence.
If you are thinking candies and sweet meats are the worst threats to our teeth, then get this – Carbonated drinks and sweet sodas are even more hazardous. Carbonation can drastically increase the acid levels in the mouth. Some studies have even shown that sports drinks and energy drinks can cause equal harm to the enamel in your tooth.
 
How to prevent: 
Cut down consumption of starchy and sugary foods. Avoid carbonated drinks
Do not snack frequently to curb the hunger pangs. Frequent snacking can cause the acid levels to be high for more time.
Try switching to sugarless gum to satisfy your craving for sweet. The process of chewing increases saliva generation in the mouth, helps cleansing the mouth and neutralizes the acid levels.
Good oral hygiene reduce bacteria levels in the mouth. Brush your teeth twice everyday if not after every meal and floss regularly.
Go to your dentist for regular checkups and get your teeth examined.
Mechanical Wear and Tear
One of the myths about our teeth is that they become brittle with age. It is not true. The purpose of our teeth is purely mechanical and so is the wear and tear. Our teeth are not prone to cracking and chipping without a foreign influence. You could have chipped teeth if you bite into a particularly hard substance; lets say a hard popcorn kernel.
If you have fillings in your teeth or have had root canal treatments, then your teeth are prone to chipping because they lack the structural strength of naturally intact teeth.
Another reason for wear and tear of your teeth is a habit of grinding or clenching your teeth. This condition, known as bruxism, causes wear in the surface of the teeth and leads to tooth decay.
 
How to prevent:
Don’t chew hard foods and avoid chewing on ice when consuming cold drinks.
Make sure the foods that you bite into do not have hard pits. The most common example is of a bucket of popcorn, which has some un-popped kernels of corn.
Visit your dentist regularly and check for any cracks or broken fillings that can lead to vulnerability of your teeth against biting hard substances.
If you have bruxism, try a dental guard at nights to avoid grinding your teeth in sleep.
 
Stains
Coffee, tea, wine, cigarettes, and chewing tobacco – all of these can lead to discoloration of your teeth and stains. Stains are largely only surface phenomena, but stains usually form at the site of organic build-up or plaque, therefore it helps to get them removed at the earliest.
 
How to prevent:
Avoid any food that stains your teeth
Good oral hygiene and regularly brushing your teeth can help removing plaque.
Get your dentist to clean your teeth on a regular basis for removal of plaque and tartar. Your toothbrush can’t reach certain areas where plaque can form, and a dental clean up can help removal.
There are many home kits and solutions that can help keep your teeth clean and white. But remember, overuse can lead to teeth and gum damage.
 
Gum Problems
Gum diseases are the largest threats to your teeth and general health also. As you age, the risk of gum problems grows. Pockets of bacteria form on the gum line and can cause infection that damages connective tissue and the bone leading to tooth loss. 
How to prevent
Brush and floss regularly to remove plaque and bacteria.
Use an anti-bacterial mouthwash.
Check for gum diseases during your regular dental checkups.
Gum diseases are inflammatory; therefore consume foods that reduce inflammation. Omega-3 fatty acids can help in this process.  
Dry Mouth
Dry mouth is a condition caused by inadequate generation of saliva. It can lead to decay and other problems. A good flow of saliva can keep the teeth healthy and neutralize the acids that corrode the enamel in our teeth. Age does not naturally cause dry mouth, but many medications can lead to dry mouth and most of these are medicines that people consume as they age. 
How to prevent:
Visit your doctor at the early signs of dry mouth.
Ask your doctor for recommending sugar free gum that increases saliva generation in your mouth.
With a little care, you can have teeth strong enough to bite into a walnut even at a ripe old age. So keep them clean and take good care.
Note: This article is jut for the general information of the readers.  Please contact a dentist for more details and guideance

 

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