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Gireesh Babu

Gireesh Babu

Joining Date: 08 Jul , 2008
Last Login: 01:57 PM - 30 Jun , 2014
IP Address of Last Login - 117.201.250.xxx
Profile Verified by Mobile.

Reply for: BUY MCX - INTRADAY ONLY

Gireesh Babu at 11:02 AM - Jan 16, 2014 ( )

510

New Thread: BUY MCX - INTRADAY ONLY

Gireesh Babu at 10:40 AM - Jan 16, 2014 ( )

(MCX-BUY)-(500-503)-TGT-(519-525)-S/L-493;

Reply for: NIFTY MOVEMENT IN FUTURE - MY EXPECTATION

Gireesh Babu at 03:49 PM - Jan 10, 2014 ( )

I THINK LAP 3 STARTED .

New Thread: WISHING YOU ALL VERY VERY HAPPY NEW YEAR

Gireesh Babu at 11:23 AM - Jan 01, 2014 ( )

WISHING YOU ALL A VERY HAPPY AND PROSPEROUSE NEW YEAR 2014

WISHING YOU ALL GOOD HEALTH AND GOOD WEALTH IN 2014

Reply for: KEEP IN MIND BEFORE TRADING IN OPTIONS ( HEMANT )

Gireesh Babu at 10:44 PM - Dec 22, 2013 ( )

DEAR Hemant Parikh JI,

VERY INFORMATIVE STUDY MATERIAL . THANKS FOR SHARING .

Reply for: Market Every day at 9AM!

Gireesh Babu at 10:40 PM - Dec 22, 2013 ( )

TOMORROW (23-12-2013)  - NIFTY SPOT MY EXPECTATION - BUYING RANGE  - (6250-6260 ) - TARGET -  ( 6305-6326 ) - STOP LOSS - 6225 .

Reply for: MY NIFTY / BANKNIFTY TRADES & VIEWS

Gireesh Babu at 10:41 AM - Dec 13, 2013 ( )

I BOUGHT NIFTY POSITIONAL AT 6218 ( DEC FUTURE )- S/L - 6140 ( SPOT ) . TGT - 6500 - 6600 (SPOT) .

Reply for: MY NIFTY / BANKNIFTY TRADES & VIEWS

Gireesh Babu at 10:40 AM - Dec 13, 2013 ( )

I BOUGHT NIFTY POSITIONAL AT 6218 - S/L - 6140 ( SPOT ) . TGT - 6500 - 6600 (SPOT) .

Reply for: NIFTY MOVEMENT IN FUTURE - MY EXPECTATION

Gireesh Babu at 04:42 PM - Dec 09, 2013 ( )

I AM EXPECTING LAP 3 WILL START SOON

Reply for: AN APPEAL TO INDIAN VOTERS

Gireesh Babu at 10:00 PM - Dec 08, 2013 ( )

I THINK MAJORITY OF VOTERS USED THEIR VOTES WISELY .

Reply for: NOW CORRUPTION IN CRORES IS NOT A MATTER IN INDIA

Gireesh Babu at 09:47 PM - Dec 08, 2013 ( )

NOW BRAVE AND INTELLIGENT PEOPLE OF INDIA WISELY USED THEIR VOTING POWER . THEY EXPRESSED THEIR VIEWS AGAINST CORRUPTION .

Reply for: BUY DECEMBER 6500PE

Gireesh Babu at 12:39 PM - Nov 21, 2013 ( )

GOOD ONE

Reply for: My 4 years on Mudraa

Gireesh Babu at 12:40 PM - Nov 16, 2013 ( )

Reply for: CRUDEOIL FUTURE GANN SQUARE OF 9 - BUY AND SELL LEVELS

Gireesh Babu at 04:16 PM - Nov 13, 2013 ( )

THANKS FRIENDS FOR POINTOUT THE ERRORS.

REVISED LEVELS FOR 13/11/2013

                      TGT - 1 TGT - 2 TGT - 3 TGT - 4 TGT - 5
BUY  AT/ABOVE
5941 TARGETS 5957 5974 5992 6010 6028
STOPLOSS 5923            
               
      TGT - 1 TGT - 2
TGT - 3
TGT - 4
TGT - 5
SELL AT/BELOW
5923 TARGETS 5908 5890 5872 5855 5837
STOPLOSS 5941            

Reply for: CRUDEOIL FUTURE GANN SQUARE OF 9 - BUY AND SELL LEVELS

Gireesh Babu at 03:55 PM - Nov 13, 2013 ( )

REVISED LEVELS FOR 13/11/2013

                      TGT - 1 TGT - 2 TGT - 3 TGT - 4 TGT - 5
BUY  AT/ABOVE
5041 TARGETS 5057 5074 5092 5110 5128
STOPLOSS 5023            
               
      TGT - 1 TGT - 2
TGT - 3
TGT - 4
TGT - 5
SELL AT/BELOW
5023 TARGETS 5008 4990 4972 4955 4937
STOPLOSS 5041            

ON SELL SIDE 2 TARGETS ACHIEVED ONCE AND ONCE REACHED ALL TARGETS, AND IN BUY SIDE ONCE HIT STOP LOSS AND ONCE ACHIEVED 3 TARGETS .

BANKNIFTY FUTURE LEVES FOR 13/11/2013

 

                      TGT - 1 TGT - 2 TGT - 3 TGT - 4 TGT - 5
BUY  AT/ABOVE
10661 TARGETS 10681 10706 10733 10759 10785
STOPLOSS 10634            
               
      TGT - 1 TGT - 2
TGT - 3
TGT - 4
TGT - 5
SELL AT/BELOW
10634 TARGETS 10614 10588 10562 10537 10511
STOPLOSS 10661            

Reply for: CRUDEOIL FUTURE GANN SQUARE OF 9 - BUY AND SELL LEVELS

Gireesh Babu at 06:37 AM - Nov 13, 2013 ( )

LEVELS FOR 13/11/2013

                      TGT - 1 TGT - 2 TGT - 3 TGT - 4 TGT - 5
BUY  AT/ABOVE
6045 TARGETS 6062 6081 6101 6120 6140
STOPLOSS 6025            
               
      TGT - 1 TGT - 2
TGT - 3
TGT - 4
TGT - 5
SELL AT/BELOW
6025 TARGETS 6009 5989 5970 5951 5931
STOPLOSS 6045            

Reply for: CRUDEOIL FUTURE GANN SQUARE OF 9 - BUY AND SELL LEVELS

Gireesh Babu at 06:51 PM - Nov 12, 2013 ( )

UPTO NOW 2 TARGETS ACHIEVED IN BUY SIDE AND MADE HIGH  Rs.6083/- .

ON BUY SIDE 3 TARGETS ACHIEVED AND IN SELL SIDE ONCE ACHIEVED 1 TARGET AND NEXT TIME ACHIEVED FULL ATRGETS.

New Thread: AN APPEAL TO INDIAN VOTERS

Gireesh Babu at 02:35 PM - Nov 04, 2013 ( )

New Thread: WISHING YOU ALL HAPPY DIWALI

Gireesh Babu at 07:10 PM - Nov 03, 2013 ( )

♠•••• Happy Diwali ••••♠
Do not buy crackers, lighten your houses with Candles and Deeps.

Every 3.6 Second a person dies because of hunger, out of them 75% are children ...
Money burnt in last Diwali Festival is more than 2500 Crores ..

 

You can donate this money to poor and help them. Remove hunger, Diwali is the festival of lightening not the festival of crackers.

 

http://m.ak.fbcdn.net/sphotos-b.ak/hphotos-ak-snc7/599117_387818257963974_1931928819_n.jpg

New Thread: INSTANT GUIDE OF TECHNICAL INDICATORS - CANDLESTICKS

Gireesh Babu at 06:33 AM - Oct 28, 2013 ( )

Candelstick Basic Patterns

 

Japanese rice traders developed candlesticks centuries ago

to visually display price activity over a defined trading

period. Each candlestick represents the trading activity for

one period. The lines of a candlestick represent the opening,

high, low and closing values for the period.

 

 

The main body (the wide part) of the candlestick represents

the range between the opening and closing prices. If the

closing price is higher than the opening price, the main

body is white. If the closing price is lower than the opening

price, the main body is black.

The lines protruding from either end are called wicks or

shadows.

Bearish

 

Bearish 3

Pattern     A long black body followed by

several small bodys and ending in

another long black body. The small

bodys are usually contained within

the first black body's range.

Interpretation    A bearish continuation pattern.

Bearish Harami

 

Bearish Harami

Pattern A very large white body followed by a

small black body that is contained within

the previous bar.

Interpretation A bearish pattern when preceded by an

uptrend.

Bearish Harami Cross

 

Bearish Harami Cross

Pattern A Doji contained within a large white

body.

Interpretation A top reversal signal.

Big Black candle

 

Big Black Candle

Pattern An unusually long black body with a wide

range. Prices open near the high and

close near the low.

Interpretation A bearish pattern.

Big White Candle

 

Big White Candle

Pattern A very long white body with a wide range

between high and low. Prices open near

the low and close near the high.

Interpretation A bullish pattern.

Black Body

 

Black Body

Pattern This candlestick is formed when the

closing price is lower than the opening

price.

Interpretation A bearish signal. More important when

part of a pattern.

Bullish 3

 

Bullish 3

Pattern A long white body followed by three

small bodies, ending in another long

white body. The three small bodies are

contained within the first white body.

Interpretation A bullish continuation pattern

Bullish Harami

 

Bullish Harami

Pattern A very large black body is followed by a

small white body and is contained within

the black body.

Interpretation A bullish pattern when preceded by a

downtrend.

Bullish Harami Cross

 

Bullish Harami Cross

Pattern A Doji contained within a large black

body.

Interpretation A bottom reversal pattern.

Dark Cloud Cover

 

Dark Cloud Cover

Pattern A long white body followed by a black

body. The following black candlestick

opens higher than the white candlestick's

high and closes at least 50% into the

white candlestick's body.

Interpretation A bearish reversal signal during an

uptrend.

Doji

 

Doji

Pattern The open and close are the same.

Interpretation Dojis are usually components of many

candlestick patterns. This candlestick

assumes more importance the longer

the verticle line.

DoJi Star

 

Doji Star

Pattern A Doji which gaps above or below a

white or black candlestick.

Interpretation A reversal signal confirmed by the next

candlestick (eg. a long white candlestick

would confirm a reversal up).

Engulfing Bearish Line

 

Engulfing Bearish Line

Pattern A small white body followed by and

contained within a large black body.

Interpretation A top reversal signal.

Engulfing Bullish Line

 

Engulfing Bullish Line

Pattern A small black body followed by and

contained within a large white body.

Interpretation A bottom reversal signal.

Evening Doji Star

 

Evening Doji Star

Pattern A large white body followed by a Doji

that gaps above the white body. The

third candlestick is a black body that

closes 50% or more into the white body.

Interpretation A top reversal signal, more bearish than

the regular evening star pattern.

Evening Star

 

Evening Star

Pattern A large white body followed by a small

body that gaps above the white body.

The third candlestick is a black body

that closes 50% or more into the white

body.

Interpretation A top reversal signal.

Falling Widow

 

Falling Window

Pattern A gap or "window" between the low of

the first candlestick and the high of the

second candlestick.

Interpretation A rally to the gap is highly probable. The

gap should provide resistance.

Gravestone Doji

 

Gravestone Doji

Pattern The open and close are at the low of the

bar.

Interpretation A top reversal signal. The longer the

upper wick, the more bearish the signal.

Hammer

 

Hammer

Pattern A small body near the high with a long

lower wick with little or no upper wick.

Interpretation A bullish pattern during a downtrend.

Hanging Man

 

Hanging Man

Pattern A small body near the high with a long

lower wick with little or no upper wick. The

lower wick should be several times the

height of the body.

Interpretation A bearish pattern during an uptrend

Inverted Black Hammer

 

Inverted Black Hammer

Pattern An upside-down hammer with a black

body.

Interpretation A bottom reversal signal with confirmation

the next trading bar.

Inverted Hammer

 

Inverted Hammer

Pattern An upside-down hammer with a white or

black body.

Interpretation A bottom reversal signal with

confirmation the next trading bar.

Long Legged Doji

 

Long Legged Doji

Pattern A Doji pattern with long upper and lower

wicks.

Interpretation A top reversal signal.

Long Lower Shadow

 

Long Lower Shadow

Pattern A candlestick with a long lower wick with a

length equal to or longer than the range of

the candlestick.

Interpretation A bullish signal.

Long Upper Shadow

 

Long Upper Shadow

Pattern A candlestick with an upper wick that has

a length equal to or greater than the range

of the candlestick.

Interpretation A bearish signal.

Morning Doji Star

 

Morning Doji Star

Pattern A large black body followed by a Doji

that gaps below the black body. The next

candlestick is a white body that closes

50% or more into the black body.

Interpretation A bottom reversal signal

Morning Star

 

Morning Star

Pattern A large black body followed by a small

body that gaps below the black body.

The following candlestick is a white

body that closes 50% or more into the

black body.

Interpretation A bottom reversal signal.

On Neck-Line

 

On Neck-Line

Pattern In a downtrend, a black candlestick is

followed by a small white candlestick with

its close near the low of the black

candlestick.

Interpretation A bearish pattern where the market

should move lower when the white

candlestick's low is penetrated by the

next bar.

Piercing Line

 

Piercing Line

Pattern A black candlestick followed by a white

candlestick that opens lower than the

black candlestick's low, but closes 50%

or more into the black body.

Interpretation A bottom reversal signal.

Rising Window

 

Rising Window

Pattern A gap or "window" between the high of

the first candlestick and the low of the

second candlestick.

Interpretation A selloff to the gap is highly likely. The

gap should provide support.

Separating Lines Up Trend

 

Separating Lines

Pattern In an uptrend, a black candlestick is

followed by a white candlestick with the

same opening price.

In a downtrend, a white candlestick is

followed by a black candlestick with the

same opening price.

Interpretation A continuation pattern. The prior trend

should resume.

Separating Line in Down Trend

Shaven Bottom

 

Shaven Bottom

Pattern A candlestick with no lower wick.

Interpretation A bottom reversal signal with confirmation

the next trading bar.

Shaven Head

 

Shaven Head

Pattern A candlestick with no upper wick.

Interpretation A bullish pattern during a downtrend and

a bearish pattern during an uptrend.

Shooting Star

 

Shooting Star

Pattern A candlestick with a small body, long

upper wick, and little or no lower wick.

Interpretation A bearish pattern during an uptrend.

Spinning Top

 

Spinning Top

Pattern A candlestick with a small body. The size of

the wicks is not critical.

Interpretation A neutral pattern usually associated with

other formations.

Three Black Crows

 

Three Black Crows

Pattern Three long black candlesticks with

consecutively lower closes that close

near their lows.

Interpretation A top reversal signal.

Three White Soldiers

 

Three White Soldiers

Pattern Three white candlesticks with

consecutively higher closes that close

near their highs.

Interpretation A bottom reversal signal.

Tweezer Bottom

 

Tweezer Bottoms

Pattern Two or more candlesticks with matching

bottoms. The size or color of the

candlestick does not matter.

Interpretation Minor reversal signal.

Tweezer Tops

 

Tweezer Tops

Pattern Two or more candlesticks with similar

tops.

Interpretation A reversal signal.

White Body

 

White Body

Pattern A candlestick formed when the closing

price is higher than the opening price.

Interpretation A bullish signal.

New Thread: INSTANT GUIDE OF TECHNICAL INDICATORS-3

Gireesh Babu at 06:19 PM - Oct 27, 2013 ( )

CONTINUATION FROM :

http://www.mudraa.com/trading/186053/0/instant-guide-of-technical-indicators.html     & 

http://www.mudraa.com/trading/186054/0/instant-guide-of-technical-indicators-2.html

Trin - Ticks - Tiki

The Trin, Ticks, and Tiki are not really indicators in the sense of moving averages or the commodity channel index (CCI), but they can be used as indicators by day traders. The Trin, Ticks, and Tiki (specifically these names), are based upon the US markets, but the same principles can be used on European and Asian markets. These articles will explain what the Trin, Ticks, and Tiki are, and how they apply to day trading.

 

Trin

Description

The Trin is not really an indicator (in the sense of moving averages), but it can be used as an indicator when day trading. The Trin is one of the market internals, with the Ticks and Tiki being the other two. The Trin compares the volume of the advancing and declining stocks on the NYSE (New York Stock Exchange), and calculates a ratio showing which stocks (advancing or declining) have more volume.

The Trin is based upon the stocks that are traded on the NYSE, so it is primarily (actually almost exclusively) used as an indicator for the US markets, but the same principles and formulae can be applied to the European and Asian markets.

The Trin can be displayed as a single line, or as a bar chart, but it is always displayed on its own chart, separate from the price bars, and is shown as a bar chart in the example chart (view full size chart).

Calculation

  • Description : The Trin (T) is a comparison of the volume (V) being traded for advancing and declining stocks (AD).
  • Calculation :
        AD = Advancing Stocks / Declining Stocks
        V = Buying Volume / Selling Volume

        T = AD / V

Trading Use

The Trin shows where the volume is within the market. If there is more volume for the advancing stocks, the Trin will be below 1, and if there is more volume for the declining stocks, the Trin will be above 1. As the Trin can be displayed as a bar chart, it can be interpreted like a price bar chart, using concepts such as support and resistance and trend lines. The Trin can be used independently, or as part of a larger trading system.

Ticks

Description

The Ticks is not really an indicator (in the sense of moving averages), but it can be used as an indicator when day trading. The Ticks is one of three market internals, with the Trin and Tiki being the other two. The Ticks compares the number of upticking (price increasing) and downticking (price decreasing) stocks on the NYSE (New York Stock Exchange), and calculates a ratio showing whether there are more upticking or downticking stocks.

The Ticks is based upon the stocks that are traded on the NYSE, so it is primarily (actually almost exclusively) used as an indicator for the US markets, but the same principles and formulae can be applied to the European and Asian markets.

The Ticks can be displayed as a single line, or as a bar chart, but it is always displayed on its own chart, separate from the price bars, and is shown as a bar chart in the example chart (view full size chart).

Calculation

  • Description : The Ticks (T) is a comparison of the number of upticking and downticking stocks.
  • Calculation :
        T = Upticking Stocks - Downticking Stocks

Trading Use

The Ticks shows whether there are more individual stocks with increasing prices or decreasing prices, so it provides a detailed overview (detailed because it uses the individual stocks, and overview because it calculates a single value) of the sentiment of the markets. As the Ticks can be displayed as a bar chart, it can be interpreted like a price bar chart, using concepts such as support and resistance and trend lines. The Ticks can be used independently, or as part of a larger trading system.

 

Tiki

Description

The Tiki is not really an indicator (in the sense of moving averages), but it can be used as an indicator when day trading. The Tiki is one of three market internals, with the Trin and Ticks being the other two. The Tiki compares the number of upticking (price increasing) and downticking (price decreasing) stocks in the Dow Jones Stock Index, and calculates a ratio showing whether there are more upticking or downticking stocks.

The Tiki is based upon the stocks that are included in the Dow Jones Stock Index, so it is primarily (actually almost exclusively) used as an indicator for the US markets, but the same principles and formulae can be applied to the European and Asian markets.

The Tiki can be displayed as a single line, or as a bar chart, but it is always displayed on its own chart, separate from the price bars.

Calculation

  • Description : The Tiki (T) is a comparison of the number of upticking and downticking stocks.
  • Calculation :
        T = Upticking Stocks - Downticking Stocks

Note that the calculation of the Tiki is exactly the same as the Ticks, so the only difference is that the Ticks includes all of the stocks that are traded on the NYSE, but the Tiki only includes the stocks that are part of the Dow Jones Stock Index.

Trading Use

The Tiki shows whether there are more individual stocks with increasing prices or decreasing prices, so it provides a detailed overview (detailed because it uses the individual stocks, and overview because it calculates a single value) of the sentiment of the markets. As the Tiki includes less stocks than the Ticks, it reacts faster than the Ticks, and will often signal something interesting before the Ticks. As the Ticks can be displayed as a bar chart, it can be interpreted like a price bar chart, using concepts such as support and resistance and trend lines. The Ticks can be used independently, or as part of a larger trading system.



From: GIREESH BABU at 04:58 PM - Oct 28, 2013( )


Donchian Channels


Donchian Channels examine trading done over a period of proceeding days trading and plot the highest high and lowest low for each day. This is typically done for a period of 20 days (also known as the Four-Week Rule).
Donchian Channels can also be used to determine the volatility of a market. When a price is stable, the channel is narrow when the price fluctuates, the channel widens.
Breakouts from the channel signal long and short positions. A Long is established when the price exceeds the highs of the previous 20 days, and a Short is established when the price falls below the lows of the previous 20 days.

New Thread: INSTANT GUIDE OF TECHNICAL INDICATORS-2

Gireesh Babu at 01:42 PM - Oct 27, 2013 ( )

CONTINUATION FROM : http://www.mudraa.com/trading/186053/0/instant-guide-of-technical-indicators.html

Momentum

Description

The Momentum indicator is a speed of movement (or rate of change) indicator, that is designed to identify the speed (or strength) of a price movement. Usually, the momentum indicator compares the most recent closing price to a previous closing price, but it can also be used on other indicators such as moving averages. The momentum indicator is usually displayed as a single line, on its own chart, separate from the price bars, and is the bottom section in the example chart (view full size chart).

Calculation

  • Description: There are several variations of the momentum indicator, but whichever version is used, the momentum (M) is a comparison of the current closing price (CP) and a specific length of the previous closing prices (CPn).
  • Calculation:
        M = CP - CPn
    Or
        M = (CP / CPn) * 100

The version shown in the example chart is the second version shown above, where the momentum value is the most recent closing price as a percentage of the previous closing price.

Trading Use

The momentum indicator identifies when the price is moving upwards or downwards, and also by how much the price is moving upwards or downwards. When the momentum indicator is above 0 (zero), the price has upwards momentum, and when the momentum indicator is below 0 (zero) the price has downwards momentum. The momentum indicator can be used on its own, or as part of a larger trading system.



From: GIREESH BABU at 01:44 PM - Oct 27, 2013( )


Moving Average Convergence Divergence (MACD)

Description

The Moving Average Convergence Divergence (usually known by the acronym MACD) is a momentum indicator, that was developed by Gerald Appel in the 1960s. The MACD compares two exponential moving averages, and displays the difference between the moving averages as a single line, with positive and negative values, above and below a zero line (an oscillator). The MACD is displayed on its own chart, separate from the price bars, and is the lower section in the example chart (full size chart).

Calculation

  • Description : The MACD (MACD) is the difference between short term (EMAS) and long term (EMAL) exponential moving averages, and is often used with a signal line that is an exponential moving average of the MACD (EMAMACD).
  • Calculation :
        EMAS = EMASn-1 + ((2 / (n + 1)) * (Pn - EMASn-1))
        EMAL = EMALn-1 + ((2 / (n + 1)) * (Pn - EMALn-1))

        MACD = EMAS - EMAL
        EMAMACD = EMAMACDn-1 + ((2 / (n + 1)) * (Pn - EMAMACDn-1))

Trading Use

As the MACD is a momentum indicator, it shows positive momentum when it is above the zero line, and negative momentum when it is below the zero line (similar to the Commodity Channel Index (CCI)). There are many different ways of interpreting the MACD during trading, but the most popular ways (not necessarily the most profitable) include the MACD crossing its signal line and the MACD crossing the zero line. The MACD can also be used as a divergence indicator, with long entries signaled by bullish divergence, and short entries signaled by bearish divergence.




From: GIREESH BABU at 01:46 PM - Oct 27, 2013( )


Simple, Exponential, and Weighted Moving Averages

Description

Moving averages are usually used to show the mean price over a certain number of previous prices. For example, a 10 bar simple moving average of the close would show the mean closing price from the most recent 10 bars. Moving averages can also be applied to other data such as volume or other indicators, but are most commonly used with prices. There are several different types of moving averages, and they are all calculated slightly differently, but they all have a similar smoothing effect on the data, so that any unexpected price changes are removed, and the overall direction is shown more clearly.

Calculations

Some of the most popular moving averages are:

Simple Moving Average

  • Description: The simple moving average is simply the average of the last n prices.
  • Calculation: (P1 + P2 + P3 + P4 + ... + Pn) / n
  • Example: A 4 bar simple moving average with prices of 1.2640, 1.2641, 1.2642, and 1.2641 would give a moving average of 1.2641 using the calculation (1.2640 + 1.2641 + 1.2642 + 1.2641) / 4 = 1.2641

Exponential Moving Average

  • Description: The exponential moving average is a weighted average of the last n prices, where the weighting decreases exponentially with each previous price.
  • Calculation: EMAn-1 + ((2 / (n + 1)) * (Pn - EMAn-1))
  • Example: A 4 bar exponential moving average with prices of 1.5554, 1.5555, 1.5558, and 1.5560 would give a moving average of 1.5558 using the calculation 1.5556 + ((2 / (4 + 1)) * (1.5560 - 1.5556)) = 1.5558

Weighted Moving Average

  • Description: The weighted moving average is a weighted average of the last n prices, where the weighting decreases by 1 with each previous price.
  • Calculation: ((n * Pn) + ((n - 1) * Pn-1) + ((n - 2) * Pn-2) + ... ((n - (n - 1)) * Pn-(n-1)) / (n + (n - 1) + ... + (n - (n - 1)))
  • Example: A 4 bar weighted moving average with prices of 1.2900, 1.2900, 1.2903, and 1.2904 would give a moving average of 1.2903 using the calculation ((4 * 1.2904) + (3 * 1.2903) + (2 * 1.2900) + (1 * 1.2900)) / (4 + 3 + 2+ 1) = 1.2903

Trading Use

Moving averages can be used to identify a trend by using the slope of the average (or lack of slope in a ranging market). They can also be used in trend trading systems to enter and exit trades by waiting for price and moving average crossovers, or for multiple moving average crossovers. Moving averages are also used in the calculations of many other indicators, such as the Moving Average Convergence Divergence (MACD), and the Commodity Channel Index (CCI).




From: GIREESH BABU at 01:48 PM - Oct 27, 2013( )


Parabolic Stop and Reverse (Parabolic SAR)

Description

The Parabolic Stop and Reverse (usually known as Parabolic SAR, or just Parabolic) is a trend following indicator, that was developed by J. Welles Wilder. The Parabolic SAR is based upon the theory that a strong trend will continue to increase in strength over time, and will therefore follow a parabolic arc. The Parabolic SAR is displayed as a single parabolic line underneath the price bars for a long (upwards) trend, and above the price bars for a short (downwards) trend. The Parabolic SAR is displayed on the same chart as the price bars, and is the yellow lines in the example chart (full size chart).

Calculation

  • Description : The Parabolic SAR (PSAR) is the underlying parabolic arc of a trend, and uses the most recent extreme (highest and lowest) price (EP), along with an acceleration factor (AF), to determine the future points on the parabolic arc.
  • Calculation :
        EP = Highest high for a long trend, and lowest low for a short trend, updated each time a new EP is reached
        AF = Default of 0.02 (2%), increasing by 0.02 (2%) each time a new EP is reached, with a maximum of 0.20 (20%)

        PSAR = PSARn+1 = PSARn + (AF * (EP - PSARn))
        Exceptions : If PSARn+1 (the next PSAR) is within or beyond today's or yesterday's price range, PSARn+1 is set to the closest price. For example, in a long trend, PSARn+1 would be set to the closest low, and in a short trend, PSARn+1 would be set to the closest high.

Trading Use

As the Parabolic SAR is a trend following indicator, it is only designed to be used in confirmed trends, and will give very bad results in a small ranging or sideways market. Entries are signaled by the start of a new parabolic arc, and exits are signaled by the price touching the parabolic arc. As the price touching the parabolic arc, is also the reason for the start of a new parabolic arc, the exit from the current trade and the entry into a new trade occur at the same time (hence the name Parabolic Stop and Reverse). An alternative way of using the Parabolic SAR might be to indicate the direction of the current trend, and then make entries and exits based upon another indicator (such as a momentum indicator).




From: GIREESH BABU at 01:51 PM - Oct 27, 2013( )


Pivot Points

Description

Pivot Points are support and resistance levels that are calculated using the open, high, low, and close, from the previous trading day. Standard pivot points include the pivot point itself, three full support levels, and three full resistance levels, but two half way support levels, and two half way resistance levels are also often included. Daily pivot points are the most commonly used, but weekly and monthly pivot points are also available. Pivot points are displayed on charts with the price bars, and are the horizontal lines in the chart shown above.

Calculation

  • Description: Pivot points are various calculations, made using the open, high, low, and close, from the previous trading day (Y).
  • Calculation:
        PP = (YHigh + YLow + YClose) / 3
        S1 = (PP * 2) - YHigh
        S2 = PP - (YHigh - YLow)
        S3 = (2 * PP) - ((2 * YHigh) - YLow)
        R1 = (PP * 2) - YLow
        R2 = PP + (YHigh - YLow)
        R3 = (2 * PP) + (YHigh - (2 * YLow))

Trading Use

Pivot points are used as support and resistance levels, and as areas where significant price movement should be expected (such as reversals, or breakouts). There are several trading systems that use pivot points, so there are several different uses of pivot points, but in general they are used as support and resistance levels.




From: GIREESH BABU at 01:52 PM - Oct 27, 2013( )


Relative Strength Index (RSI)

Description

The Relative Strength Index (also known as RSI) is a momentum indicator that was developed by J. Welles Wilder in 1978. It is calculated using the price, and is used as an oscillator showing overbought and oversold levels. The RSI compares the upward price movement to downward price movement over the specified timeframe, and displays the result as a momentum line oscillating between 0 and 100. The RSI is displayed on its own chart, separate from the price bars, and is the lower section in the chart shown above.

Calculation

  • Description: The RSI is the ratio of exponential moving averages of the upward (U) and downward (D) price movements, normalized into a value between 0 and 100.
  • Calculation:
        U = Pn - Pn-1
        D = Pn - Pn-1
        EMAUP = EMAUn-1 + ((2 / (n + 1)) * (Un - EMAUn-1))
        EMADOWN = EMADn-1 + ((2 / (n + 1)) * (Dn - EMADn-1))

        RSI = 100 X (EMAUP / (EMAUP + EMADOWN))

Trading Use

The RSI can be used in both ranging and trending markets, and therefore can be used in several different ways. The RSI can be used to identify an overbought level when it is above 70, and an oversold level when it is below 30. The RSI can also be used as a divergence indicator, with entries based upon divergence between the RSI and the price bars.




From: GIREESH BABU at 01:54 PM - Oct 27, 2013( )


Stochastic Oscillator

Description

The Stochastic Oscillator (usually known just as Stochastic) is a momentum indicator, that was developed by George Lane in the 1950s. The Stochastic Oscillator is based upon the theory that prices move in waves, moving back and forth between an overbought level and an oversold level (even within strong trends). The Stochastic Oscillator is usually displayed as a stochastic line, and a signal line which is a moving average of the stochastic line. The Stochastic Oscillator is displayed on its own chart, separate from the price bars, and is the lower section in the example chart (full size chart).

Calculation

  • Description : The Stochastic Oscillator (S) is a comparison of the most recent closing price (CP) and the recent range (R). The signal line is a simple moving average of the stochastic oscillator (SMAS).
  • Calculation :
        CP = (CLOSEn - LOW(L ... Ln))
        R = (HIGH(H ... Hn) - LOW(L ... Ln))

        S (%K) = 100 * (CP / R)
        SMAS (%D) = (S + S1 + S2 + ... + Sn) / n

Trading Use

As the Stochastic Oscillator is both a momentum indicator, and an overbought / oversold indicator, it can be used with both trending and ranging markets, and can be used in both short and long term timeframes. There are several ways of interpreting the Stochastic Oscillator during trading. One of the most popular ways is to enter a long trade when the stochastic line crosses above the signal line, and enter a short trade when the stochastic line crosses below the signal line. A common variation of this technique is to only make entries when the crossover occurs below or above specific thresholds (usually 30 and 70).




From: GIREESH BABU at 01:57 PM - Oct 27, 2013( )


Triangular Moving Average (TMA)

Description

The triangular moving average (also known as the TMA) is similar to other moving averages in that it shows the mean price over a specified number of previous prices. However, the triangular moving average differs from most moving averages in that it is double smoothed (i.e. it is averaged twice). The triangular moving average can be calculated using various input data (prices, volume, or another technical indicator), but is most often calculated using prices. The triangular moving average is usually displayed with the price bars, and is the yellow line in the example chart.

Calculation

  • Description: The triangular moving average (TMA) is a weighted average of the last n prices (P), whose result is equivalent to a double smoothed simple moving average (i.e. calculated twice).
  • Calculation:
        SMA = (P1 + P2 + P3 + P4 + ... + Pn) / n

        TMA = (SMA1 + SMA2 + SMA3 + SMA4 + ... SMAn) / n

Trading Use

As with other moving averages, the triangular moving average can be used to identify a trend by using the slope of the average (or lack of slope in a ranging market). However, due to the additional smoothing, triangular moving averages tend to be smoother, and have more waves, than standard moving averages. Interestingly, triangular moving averages often appear more responsive to direction changes, even though the additional smoothing actually moves the domainant input value to the middle of the input series (which would decrease responsiveness).




From: GIREESH BABU at 01:58 PM - Oct 27, 2013( )


TRIX

Description

The TRIX is a momentum indicator, that is displayed as an oscillator above and below a zero line. It compares two triple smoothed exponential moving averages, and displays the difference as a single line with positive and negative values. The TRIX is displayed on its own chart, separate from the price bars, and is the lower section in the example chart.

Calculation

  • Description : The TRIX (T) is a comparison of the current and previous triple smoothed exponential moving averages.
  • Calculation :
        EMA1 = EMA1n-1 + ((2 / (n + 1)) * (Pn - EMA1n-1))
        EMA2 = EMA2n-1 + ((2 / (n + 1)) * (EMA1n - EMA2n-1))
        EMA3 = EMA3n-1 + ((2 / (n + 1)) * (EMA2n - EMA3n-1))

        T = (EMA3n - EMA3n-1 ) / EMA3n-1

Trading Use

The TRIX is usually used as an oscillator, with long and short entries signaled by the TRIX crossing its zero line. It can also be used as a divergence indicator, with long entries signaled by bullish divergence, and short entries signaled by bearish divergence.




From: GIREESH BABU at 02:00 PM - Oct 27, 2013( )


Volatility Ratio

Description

The Volatility Ratio is a price range based indicator, that is designed to identify price ranges and breakouts from the price ranges. The Volatility Ratio calculates a version of the price range (known as the true range), and then identifies when the price has moved outside of this price range. The Volatility Ratio is usually displayed as a single line, on its own chart, separate from the price bars, and is the bottom section in the example chart (view full size chart).

Calculation

  • Description : The Volatility Ratio (VR) is a comparison of the current true range (TR) and a specific length of the previous true range (PR).
  • Calculation :
        TR = (HIGH - LOW | HIGH - CLOSE-1 | CLOSE-1 - LOW)
        PR = (HIGH(H ... Hn | CLOSE-1) - LOW(L ... Ln) | CLOSE-1)

        VR = TR / PR

Trading Use

The Volatility Ratio identifies when the price has moved outside of its recent price range, and is therefore used to identify breakouts. The exact level at which a breakout is signaled will vary depending upon the market being traded, but a popular level is 0.5 (which is when the current true range is twice the recent true range). The Volatility Ratio can be combined with other indicators, such as a volume indicator, that would confirm that the current volume is supporting the breakout.




From: GIREESH BABU at 02:02 PM - Oct 27, 2013( )


What Is the Volume Rate Of Change?

VROC - Measuring Volume To Confirm Momentum

The Volume Rate of Change indicator is a type of momentum indicator that is often used by traders to quantify the current momentum and the true underlying conviction in a trading instrument based on volume. The VROC is classified as a "centered" oscillator (a commonly-used technical analysis tool measuring movement above and below a zero centerline) comparing current and previous volume. Unlike Rate of Change and other momentum price indicators, VROC is blind to the price movement of the instrument being measured.

VROC demonstrates the velocity (speed) at which the trading volume is increasing or decreasing over a period of time, signaling that there is either positive or negative momentum in the instrument that is being measured. The oscillator signal fluctuates as a percentage around the zero line. A signal above the zero line is positive and indicates that the current volume change has increased over the previous period. Inversely, the indicator signal will be negative (below the zero line) when the current volume change has declined from the previous period.

VROC is a widely-used indicator that traders can expect to find offered among the core package of tools provided by most commercially available charting services. Although there are several options in terms of how the signal can be displayed, including both bar and candlestick charts, it is generally presented as a line chart, which is plotted separately in a window directly beneath the primary price chart.

How It's Calculated

Description: VROC measures the current volume of a trading instrument against the volume of the same instrument in a previous period (the common default is 14 days, but day traders will generally decrease the period that is measured to account for the short-term nature or their trades) to determine if volume in general is either increasing or decreasing. It compares the current volume change to the volume in the previous period to give indication as to the strength or weakness of the current volume. That information provides traders insight as to whether the current trend is likely to continue or is in fact suspect, which might signal an imminent change in trend. VROC is obtained by dividing the volume change over a previous period (N) by the volume of the previous period (N).

Calculation: VROC = [(Current Volume - Volume "N" Previous Period) / (Volume "N" Previous Period)] X 100
(N = previous period - e.g. 14 days)

Trading Use

VROC is most useful to traders when used to confirm price moves. It is also a good tool for identifying possible divergence between price movement and momentum - often a precursor to a trend change or reversal. A positive or inclining signal above the zero line can serve to validate the current price trend (bullish or bearish) while a negative or declining signal below the zero line is cautionary and indicates an existing trend may be weakening. Traders often use VROC to gauge whether or not a trading instrument has the necessary momentum to break through key support or resistance levels, as well as to forecast possible trend breaks and reversals.

The number of periods selected for comparison is an important element - longer time frames are best suited for swing or longer-term trades, while shorter periods are more suitable for day trades. Day traders do need to consider the fact that utilizing a shorter period can cause the indicator to be more prone to fluctuations and false signals, so it's important to test varying time frames to get a good feel for the indicator before trading live using VROC. The VROC indicator is generally used in conjunction with a price chart and other indicators to avoid whipsaw.




From: GIREESH BABU at 02:03 PM - Oct 27, 2013( )


Indicator Settings

Technical analysis indicators are mathematical formulae that day traders use to watch their markets, and decide when to make their trades. Indicators are usually shown on a graphical chart along with the past and current market data (price, volume, etc.), and are updated in real time (i.e. with every price change). Traders watch the graphical chart, and wait for specific patterns to form to signal the entries and exits for their trades.

There are many different indicators to choose from, and they vary in their level of mathematical complication, but they are all configured using similar settings. Different charting software might use different names for the settings (such as a moving average line being called a signal line), but the mathematics will be identical, and will affect the indicators in the same way.

Length

The length is one of the main indicator settings, and is used by almost every indicator. The length specifies the amount of market data that is included in the indicator's calculations.

For example, a moving average with a length of ten will calculate the average of the most recent ten bars (or candlesticks, etc.).

Signal Length

While technically not part of the actual indicator, many indicators provide a signal line. A signal line is usually a simple moving average of the main indicator line, which creates a slower version of the indicator. The signal length specifies the amount of indicator data that is included in the signal line's calculation.

For example, a Relative Strength Index (RSI) with a signal length of five will include a signal line based upon the most recent five RSI values in its calculation.

Input Data

The input data setting specifies what the indicator will be based upon, and offers several choices depending upon the chart being used. Bar and candlestick charts allow an indicator to be based upon any of the following:

  • Open - The first price traded during the bar or candlestick
  • High - The highest price traded during the bar or candlestick
  • Low - The lowest price traded during the bar or candlestick
  • Close - The last price traded during the bar or candlestick

and most charting software also provide the following choices for most indicators:

  • OHLC Average - The average of the opening, highest, lowest, and last prices traded during the bar or candlestick (i.e. (Open + High + Low + Close) / 4)
  • HLC Average - The average of the highest, lowest, and last prices traded during the bar or candlestick (i.e. (High + Low + Close) / 3)

Some charting software also allow indicators to be based upon other indicators, and use the other indicator's values as its input data. For example, a Momentum indicator could use the values from an Exponential Moving Average as its input data, and the Momentum indicator would then show the momentum of the moving average rather than the actual market prices.

Configuration Examples

With most technical analysis indicators, increasing the length setting will appear to slow the indicator down, by making it less susceptible to changes in its input data. For example, a Commodity Channel Index (CCI) with a length of 7 might react to a single large bar, but the same CCI with a length of 14 might not react to the same large bar. If you are using an indicator that appears too jumpy, try increasing the length, and the indicator should calm down.

Many charting software use the close (the last price traded during the bar or candlestick) as the default input data. If the close is the most important price for your trading system then this is the best choice, but if your trading system also uses the high and low, then either the OHLC average or the HLC average might be a better choice for the indicator's input data.




From: GIREESH BABU at 02:06 PM - Oct 27, 2013( )


The Close

Technical indicators (e.g. moving averages) are mathematical calculations that are used on graphical charts, to display a market's trading information (e.g. the recent price movement) in a different manner. Indicators usually have several settings that can be configured by the trader to modify the way that the indicators are displayed (e.g. the number of candlesticks that are used in the indicator's calculation, etc.). One of the available, but least often modified settings, is the indicator's input data, for which there are usually several choices, one of which (and often the default of which) is the close.

The Close, or the Last

The close (sometimes known as the last), is the most recent price that was traded at during the time frame (e.g. a ten minute candlestick might have a close of 76).

The calculation of the close is essentially non existant, as it is as follows:

  • Close = Close

For example, if a ten minute candlestick has a final price of 76, then the close, would be calculated as follows:

  • Close = 76

Indicator Input Data

The default settings for many indicators use the close (or the last) of the time frame as the input data, and using the close is perfectly acceptable, but using one of the other choices (e.g. the average of the high, low, and close) as the input data, can display the indicator quite differently from the default settings.

The close is the final price that was traded at during the time frame, and therefore disregards all of the previous trading information for the time frame (e.g. the range of the time frame, etc.), and only considers the most recent trading information (i.e. the last price of the time frame) as being relevant (which may or may not be a good idea depending upon the indicator).

Either the close of the time frame, or one of the averages of the time frame (e.g. the average of the high, low, and close), can be used as an indicator's input data (i.e. both are equally correct), but it is useful to know the difference, because it can explain why two seemingly identical indicators are being displayed differently.




From: GIREESH BABU at 02:08 PM - Oct 27, 2013( )


Calculating DAX Daily Range with the VDAX Volatility Index

The VDAX (also known as the VDAX-NEW and V1X) is the volatility index that displays the implied volatility (i.e. the expected range) of the DAX stock index for the next thirty days. As such, the VDAX is used by DAX traders to determine the expected daily range of the DAX stock index and futures market.

Calculation

The calculation that is used to determine the daily DAX range is as follows. The information that is required for the calculation is the VDAX value (VDAX) and the DAX closing price from the previous day (DAXCLOSE).

  • Daily Range as a Percentage (DR%) = VDAX / 20
  • Daily Range in DAX Points (DRPoints) = (DAXCLOSE / 100) * DR%
  • Expected DAX High = DAXCLOSE + DRPOINTS
  • Expected DAX Low = DAXCLOSE - DRPOINTS

For example, assuming a VDAX value of 30, and a DAX closing price of 4000, the calculation would be as follows:

  • Daily Range as a Percentage (DR%) = 30 / 20 = 1.5%
  • Daily Range in DAX Points (DRPoints) = (4000 / 100) * 1.5 = 60 Points
  • Expected DAX High = 4000 + 60 = 4060
  • Expected DAX Low = 4000 - 60 = 3940

Further Information

Definition:

The VDAX volatility index (actually VDAX-NEW to differentiate it from the previous version) is an indication of the expected volatility (i.e. range) of the DAX stock index for the next thirty days. The VDAX is provided by Deutsche Boerse in Germany, and is calculated using the DAX options that are traded on the Eurex electronic trading system. The VDAX is calculated once per minute from 8:50 AM until 5:30 PM Central European Time. The symbols for the VDAX volatility index are VDAX (for the previous version), and either VDAX-NEW or V1X for the current version.

VDAX and Implied Volatility

The VDAX volatility index indicates the implied volatility (i.e. the expected range) of the DAX stock index for the next thirty days as a percentage of the current DAX stock index price. For example, a DAX stock index price of 4,000 and a VDAX of 10 would indicate that the DAX stock index is expected to fluctuate between 4,400 and 3,600 over the next thirty days.

Trading the VDAX

The VDAX volatility index is used by options traders to calculate options premiums (i.e. options prices), and also by DAX traders to determine the expected daily range for the DAX stock index and futures market. The VDAX is also a tradeable market in its own right, by way of its futures market, which is traded on the Eurex electronic exchange from 8:50 AM to 5:30 PM Central European Time.

Also Known As: VDAX, VDAX-NEW, V1X (not VIX)




From: GIREESH BABU at 02:09 PM - Oct 27, 2013( )


Average of the High and Low

Technical indicators (e.g. moving averages) are mathematical calculations that are used on graphical charts, to display a market's trading information (e.g. the recent price movement) in a different manner. Indicators usually have several settings that can be configured by the trader to modify the way that the indicators are displayed (e.g. the number of candlesticks that are used in the indicator's calculation, etc.). One of the available, but least often modified settings, is the indicator's input data, for which there are usually several choices, one of which is often the average of the high and low.

The Average of the High and Low, or the HL Average

The average of the high and low (sometimes known as the HL average), is the average value of the highest price that was reached during the time frame, and the lowest price that was reached during the time frame (e.g. a ten minute candlestick might have a high of 85 and a low of 66).

The calculation of the average of the high and low, is as follows:

  • HL Average = (High + Low) / 2

For example, if a ten minute candlestick has a high of 85 and a low of 66, then the average of the high and low would be calculated as follows:

  • HL Average = (85 + 66) / 2 = 76

Indicator Input Data

The default settings for many indicators use the close of the time frame as the input data, but using the average of the high and low as the input data, can display the indicator quite differently from the default settings.

The average of the high and low is the average of the entire time frame, and therefore includes all of the trading information for the time frame.

Either the close of the time frame, or the average of the high and low, of the time frame, can be used as an indicator's input data (i.e. both are equally correct), but it is useful to know the difference, because it can explain why two seemingly identical indicators are being displayed differently.




From: GIREESH BABU at 02:12 PM - Oct 27, 2013( )


Average of the Open, High, Low, and Close

Technical indicators (e.g. moving averages) are mathematical calculations that are used on graphical charts, to display a market's trading information (e.g. the recent price movement) in a different manner. Indicators usually have several settings that can be configured by the trader to modify the way that the indicators are displayed (e.g. the number of candlesticks that are used in the indicator's calculation, etc.). One of the available, but least often modified settings, is the indicator's input data, for which there are usually several choices, one of which is often the average of the open, high, low, and close.

The Average of the Open, High, Low, and Close, or the OHLC Average

The average of the open, high, low, and close (sometimes known as the OHLC average), is the average value of the opening price for the time frame, the highest price that was reached during the time frame, the lowest price that was reached during the time frame, and the closing price for the time frame (e.g. a ten minute candlestick might have an open of 68, a high of 85, a low of 66, and a close of 72).

The calculation of the average of the open, high, low, and close, is as follows:

  • OHLC Average = (Open + High + Low + Close) / 4

For example, if a ten minute candlestick has an open of 68, a high of 85, a low of 66, and a close of 72, then the average of the open, high, low, and close, would be calculated as follows:

  • OHLC Average = (68 + 85 + 66 + 72) / 4 = 73

Indicator Input Data

The default settings for many indicators use the close of the time frame as the input data, but using the average of the open, high, low, and close as the input data, can display the indicator quite differently from the default settings.

The average of the open, high, low, and close, is an open and close weighted average of the entire time frame, and therefore includes all of the trading information for the time frame, with additional importance placed upon the initial and most recent trading information (i.e. the first price and the last price of the time frame).

Either the close of the time frame, or the average of the open, high, low, and close, of the time frame, can be used as an indicator's input data (i.e. both are equally correct), but it is useful to know the difference, because it can explain why two seemingly identical indicators are being displayed differently.




From: GIREESH BABU at 06:11 PM - Oct 27, 2013( )


Trin - Ticks - Tiki

The Trin, Ticks, and Tiki are not really indicators in the sense of moving averages or the commodity channel index (CCI), but they can be used as indicators by day traders. The Trin, Ticks, and Tiki (specifically these names), are based upon the US markets, but the same principles can be used on European and Asian markets. These articles will explain what the Trin, Ticks, and Tiki are, and how they apply to day trading.

 

Trin

Description

The Trin is not really an indicator (in the sense of moving averages), but it can be used as an indicator when day trading. The Trin is one of the market internals, with the Ticks and Tiki being the other two. The Trin compares the volume of the advancing and declining stocks on the NYSE (New York Stock Exchange), and calculates a ratio showing which stocks (advancing or declining) have more volume.

The Trin is based upon the stocks that are traded on the NYSE, so it is primarily (actually almost exclusively) used as an indicator for the US markets, but the same principles and formulae can be applied to the European and Asian markets.

The Trin can be displayed as a single line, or as a bar chart, but it is always displayed on its own chart, separate from the price bars, and is shown as a bar chart in the example chart (view full size chart).

Calculation

  • Description : The Trin (T) is a comparison of the volume (V) being traded for advancing and declining stocks (AD).
  • Calculation :
        AD = Advancing Stocks / Declining Stocks
        V = Buying Volume / Selling Volume

        T = AD / V

Trading Use

The Trin shows where the volume is within the market. If there is more volume for the advancing stocks, the Trin will be below 1, and if there is more volume for the declining stocks, the Trin will be above 1. As the Trin can be displayed as a bar chart, it can be interpreted like a price bar

New Thread: INSTANT GUIDE OF TECHNICAL INDICATORS

Gireesh Babu at 12:48 PM - Oct 27, 2013 ( )

Trend Lines

Trend Lines are on of the most basic, but also most powerful, indicators available to day traders and long term traders alike. The following articles will explain how to draw trend lines in all three directions (upwards, downwards, and sideways), and how trend lines can be used as part of a complete trading system.
 

Drawing Upward Trend Lines

Introduction

Trend Line Chart

Upward trend lines are used when the price is consistently moving upwards (an upward trend). Upward trend lines are drawn from a low point on the left to a high point on the right (/), and are drawn below the price bars, so that it appears as though the trend line is holding the prices up (known as support). Trend lines will be easy to fit to the prices bars if the current price movement is smooth, but trend lines will not fit as well if the price movement is not smooth.

Trend Lines can be defined as both a mathematical formulae (which is useful for automated trend line trading), and as a visual pattern on a price chart (which can be easily recognized by human traders). This tutorial will cover drawing trend lines visually, as this is the most useful method for beginning day traders.

Wait for a Low Reversal

Trend Line Chart

Interestingly, the first requirement for an upward trend line is that the prices are moving downwards. The price bars need to move downwards, and then reverse, and move upwards, making a low reversal. The low reversal will become the lowest and left most point of the upward trend line. The low reversal is shown in yellow in the example chart.

Wait for a New High

Trend Line Chart

The second requirement for an upward trend line is that the prices move upwards from the low reversal, and make a new high. The new high will not be part of the actual trend line, but it is the beginning of the upward price movement (the trend). If the new high is not made, then the prices are not starting an upward trend, and may move sideways instead. The upward price movement and new high are shown by the yellow arrow in the example chart.

Wait for a Second Low Reversal

Trend Line Chart

The third requirement for an upward trend line is a second low reversal, which is also known as a higher low reversal, because it occurs at a higher price than the first low reversal. The second low reversal will become the second point of the upward trend line, and also confirms that the price is moving upwards (an upward trend). The second low reversal is shown in yellow in the example chart.

Draw the Trend Line

Trend Line Chart

Once the first three steps have been completed, the requirements for an upward trend line have been met, and the actual trend line can be drawn. The trend line is drawn from the low of the first low reversal (step 2), to the low of the second low reversal (step 4), and then continued into the future (which may not yet be visible on the chart). The trend line and its extension into the future are shown in yellow on the example chart.

Trading the Upward Trend Line

Trend Line Chart

Once the upward trend line has been completed, the trend line can be used for trading. Upward trend lines can be used in several different ways, with the most popular being trend line bounces (long trades) and trend line breaks (short trades). The completed trend line and a future trend line bounce, are shown in yellow in the example chart.



From: GIREESH BABU at 12:54 PM - Oct 27, 2013( )


Drawing Downward Trend Lines

Introduction

Trend Line Chart

 

Downward trend lines are used when the price is consistently moving downwards (a downward trend). Downward trend lines are drawn from a high point on the left to a low point on the right (\), and are drawn above the price bars, so that it appears as though the trend line is keeping the prices down (known as resistance). Trend lines will be easy to fit to the prices bars if the current price movement is smooth, but trend lines will not fit as well if the price movement is not smooth.

 

Trend Lines can be defined as both a mathematical formulae (which is useful for automated trend line trading), and as a visual pattern on a price chart (which can be easily recognized by human traders). This tutorial will cover drawing trend lines visually, as this is the most useful method for beginning day traders.

Wait for a High Reversal

Trend Line Chart

Interestingly, the first requirement for a downward trend line is that the prices are moving upwards. The price bars need to move upwards, and then reverse, and move downwards, making a high reversal. The high reversal will become the highest and left most point of the downward trend line. The high reversal is shown in yellow in the example chart.

Wait for a New Low

Trend Line Chart

The second requirement for a downward trend line is that the prices move downwards from the high reversal, and make a new low. The new low will not be part of the actual trend line, but it is the beginning of the downward price movement (the trend). If the new low is not made, then the prices are not starting a downward trend, and may move sideways instead. The downward price movement and new low are shown by the yellow arrow in the example chart.

Wait for a Second High Reversal

Trend Line Chart

The third requirement for a downward trend line is a second high reversal, which is also known as a lower high reversal, because it occurs at a lower price than the first high reversal. The second high reversal will become the second point of the downward trend line, and also confirms that the price is moving downwards (a downward trend). The second high reversal is shown in yellow in the example chart.

Draw the Trend Line

Trend Line Chart

Once the first three steps have been completed, the requirements for a downward trend line have been met, and the actual trend line can be drawn. The trend line is drawn from the high of the first high reversal (step 2), to the high of the second high reversal (step 4), and then continued into the future (which may not yet be visible on the chart). The trend line and its extension into the future are shown in yellow on the example chart.

Trading the Downward Trend Line

Trend Line Chart

Once the downward trend line has been completed, the trend line can be used for trading. Downward trend lines can be used in several different ways, with the most popular being trend line bounces (short trades) and trend line breaks (long trades). The completed trend line and a future trend line bounce, are shown in yellow in the example chart.




From: GIREESH BABU at 12:59 PM - Oct 27, 2013( )


Drawing Sideways Trend Lines

Introduction

Trend Line Chart

 

Sideways trend lines are used when the price is moving sideways (also known as consolidation). Sideways trend lines are drawn from a point on the left to a similar point on the right (-), and are drawn either above or below the price bars (known as support or resistance). Sideways trend lines will be easy to fit to the prices bars if the price movement is really horizontal, but sideways trend lines will not fit as well if the price movement is rising or falling slightly.

 

Trend Lines can be defined as both a mathematical formulae (which is useful for automated trend line trading), and as a visual pattern on a price chart (which can be easily recognized by human traders). This tutorial will cover drawing trend lines visually, as this is the most useful method for beginning day traders.

Wait for a High or Low Reversal

Trend Line Chart

Interestingly, the first requirement for a sideways trend line is that the prices are moving either upwards or downwards. The price bars need to move upwards or downwards, and then reverse, and move in the opposite direction, making a high or low reversal. The reversal will become the first point of the sideways trend line. A low reversal is shown in yellow in the example chart.

Wait for a New Low or High

Trend Line Chart

The second requirement for a sideways trend line is that the prices move away from the high or low reversal, and make a new low or high. The new low or high will not be part of the actual trend line, but it is necessary to define the sideways movement (the trend or consolidation). If the new low or high is not made, then the sideways trend line will be difficult to fit to the prices, even though the prices may be moving sideways. An upward price movement and new high are shown by the yellow arrow in the example chart.

Wait for a Second High or Low Reversal

Trend Line Chart

The third requirement for a sideways trend line is a second high or low reversal, that matches the direction of the first high or low reversal. The second reversal will become the second point of the sideways trend line, and also confirms that the price is moving sideways (a sideways trend). The second low reversal is shown in yellow in the example chart.

Draw the Trend Line

Trend Line Chart

Once the first three steps have been completed, the requirements for a sideways trend line have been met, and the actual trend line can be drawn. The trend line is drawn from the first reversal (step 2), to the second reversal (step 4), and then continued into the future (which may not yet be visible on the chart). The trend line and its extension into the future are shown in yellow on the example chart.

Trading the Sideways Trend Line

Trend Line Chart

Once the sideways trend line has been completed, the trend line can be used for trading. Sideways trend lines can be used in several different ways, with the most popular being trend line bounces (long or short trades) and trend line breaks (also long or short trades). The completed trend line and a future trend line break, are shown in yellow in the example chart.




From: GIREESH BABU at 01:03 PM - Oct 27, 2013( )


Accumulation Distribution

Description

Accumulation Distribution is a price and volume indicator. It compares the open and close of the current price bar, with the range of the current price bar, and uses the result to weight the volume of the current price bar. It cumulatively tracks the volume, and displays the result as a single line with values above and below zero. Accumulation Distribution is displayed on its own chart, separate from the price bars, and is the lower section in the chart shown above.

Calculation

  • Description: Accumulation Distribution (AD) is a comparison of the price movement and the current range, with the result being used to weight the current volume.
  • Calculation:
        AD = ((Close - Open) / (High - Low)) * Volume

Trading Use

Accumulation Distribution is usually used as a divergence indicator, with long entries signaled by bullish divergence, and short entries signaled by bearish divergence. Accumulation Distribution can also be used as an exit indicator, by showing the end (or the weakening) of the current trend.





From: GIREESH BABU at 01:08 PM - Oct 27, 2013( )


Aroon

 

Description

Aroon is a technical analysis indicator that was developed by Tushar Chande in 1995. Aroon is a sanskrit word meaning dawn's early light, and the Aroon indicator is so named because it it is designed to signal the beginning of a new trend. Aroon consists of two lines (known as Aroon up and down) which oscillate between 0 and 100 (usually in opposite directions).

 

Calculation

 

  • Description: Aroon up (AU) is calculated as the number of bars that have elapsed since the most recent highest high (HB), and Aroon down (AD) is calculated as the number of bars that have elapsed since the most recent lowest low (LB), as a reverse percentage of the total number of bars (X).
  • Calculation:
        AU = ((X - HB) / X) x 100
        AD = ((X - LB) / X) x 100

Example:
If the total number of bars is 10, and the most recent bar is the highest high, Aroon up would be calculated as follows:<br>     AU = ((10 - 0) / 10) x 100 = 100

Trading Use

 

Aroon is most often used to indicate the start of a new trend (i.e. a change of direction), and as an indication of the strength of the current trend. A new trend is indicated by the Aroon up and down lines crossing over each other. The strength of the current trend is indicated by the Aroon up and/or down lines being at or near 100 (which shows that the most recent bars have made new highs or lows).




From: GIREESH BABU at 01:11 PM - Oct 27, 2013( )


Bollinger Bands

Description

Bollinger bands are a technical analysis indicator that was developed by John Bollinger in the 1980s. Bollinger bands create a standard deviation channel around a moving average of recent prices. Bollinger Bands are displayed as a single moving average line, with two evenly spaced standard deviation lines (one on each side of the moving average line). Bollinger bands are displayed on the same chart as the price bars, and are the yellow and blue lines on the example chart.

Calculation

  • Description: Bollinger bands are an upper band (UB) and a lower band (LB) which are a default of two standard deviations (STDEV) of the n most recent prices (Pn), above and below a simple moving average (SMA) of the n most recent prices.
  • Calculation:
        SMA = (P1 + P2 + P3 + P4 + ... + Pn) / n
        UB = SMA + STDEV(P1 ... Pn)
        LB = SMA - STDEV(P1 ... Pn)

Trading Use

Bollinger bands are an indication of the volatility of recent prices. If the recent prices have a larger range than the previous prices, the bollinger bands will expand. If the recent prices have a smaller range than the previous prices, the bollinger bands will contract.

Bollinger bands are used in many different ways by different traders. Some traders make trades when the price moves above or below the bollinger bands (i.e. when the price breaks out of the bollinger bands channel). Some traders make trades near the moving average, and use the bollinger bands as targets. Bollinger bands are also used by options traders that trade using volatility, because recent volatility is part of the calculation of options' premiums.




From: GIREESH BABU at 01:14 PM - Oct 27, 2013( )


Commodity Channel Index (CCI)


Description

The Commodity Channel Index (also known as CCI) is a momentum indicator that was first introduced by Donald Lambert in 1980. It can be used either as an oscillator showing overbought and oversold levels, or as a trend indicator showing the beginning and end of trends. The CCI is calculated using the price, a simple moving average of the price, and a standard deviation around the price. The CCI displays the difference between the price and the simple moving average as a momentum line oscillating around a 0 (zero) line. A scaling factor is also used (0.015 by default), so that most of the values are between 100 and -100. The CCI is displayed on its own chart, separate from the price bars, and is the lower section in the chart shown above.

Calculation

  • Description: The CCI is the difference between the typical price and the simple moving average of the typical price, divided by the standard deviation of the typical price multiplied by the scaling factor.
  • Calculation:
        TP = ((H + L + C) / 3)
        TPSMA = ((TP1 + TP2 + TP3 + TP4 + ... + TPn) / n)
        SD = ((ABS(TP1 - TPSMA) + ... + ABS(TPn - TPSMA)) / n)

        CCI = (TPn - TPSMAn) / (SD * 0.015)

Trading Use

The CCI is used in several popular trading systems, and therefore has many different ways that it can be used in trading. It can be used as an oscillator, to identify an overbought level when the CCI is above 100, and an oversold level when the CCI is below the -100 line. The CCI can also be used to identify the beginning of a trend when the CCI crosses above the 100 line or below the -100 line, and the end of a trend when it crosses back over the line. The CCI is also used as a pattern indicator, where trades are entered and exited based upon the patterns created by the momentum line, and trend lines are drawn on the CCI instead of the prices.




From: GIREESH BABU at 01:16 PM - Oct 27, 2013( )


Directional Movement Index (DMI)

Description

The Directional Movement Index (also known as DMI) is a momentum indicator that was developed by J. Welles Wilder. It is calculated using the price, compares the current price with the previous price range, and displays the result as an upward movement line (+DI), and a downward movement line (-DI), between 0 and 100. The DMI also calculates the strength of the upward or downward movement, and displays the result as a trend strength line (ADX). The DMI is displayed on its own chart, separate from the price bars, and is the lower section in the chart shown above.

Calculation

  • Description: The DMI is the ratio of exponential moving averages of the greater of the upward (U) and downward (D) price movements, and the true range (TR).
  • Calculation:
        U = Hn - Hn-1
        D = Ln-1 - Ln
        TR = (Hn - Ln) | (Hn - Cn-1) | (Cn-1 - Ln)
        EMAUP = EMAUn-1 + ((2 / (n + 1)) * (Un - EMAUn-1))
        EMADOWN = EMADn-1 + ((2 / (n + 1)) * (Dn - EMADn-1))
        EMATR = EMATRn-1 + ((2 / (n + 1)) * (TRn - EMATRn-1))
        +DI = EMAUP / EMATR
        -DI = EMADOWN / EMATR

        DX = ABS(+DI - -DI) / (+DI + -DI)
        ADX = EMADXn-1 + ((2 / (n + 1)) * (DXn - EMADXn-1))

Trading Use

The Directional Movement Index can be used in both ranging and trending markets. In general, when the +DI line is above the -DI line, the market is moving upwards, and when the -DI line is above the +DI line, the market is moving downwards. The ADX line shows the strength of the move, and the market is considered to be trending when the ADX line is above 30, and ranging when the ADX line is below 30. There are several trading systems that use the DMI, so there are several alternative uses of both the DI lines, and the ADX line.




From: GIREESH BABU at 01:18 PM - Oct 27, 2013( )


Donchian Channel

Description

The donchian channel is a volatility indicator, that calculates the recent price range using the recent high and low prices. The donchian channel is displayed as high and low bands (creating a channel containing the prices), and therefore it looks similar to other volatility indicators such as Bollinger Bands. However, the donchian channel is different in that it uses a simple calculation using only the recent high and low prices (rather than standard deviations or other indicators). The donchian channel is displayed with the price bars, and is the green and red lines (green for the high, and red for the low) in the example chart.

Calculation

  • Description: The donchian channel is a calculation of the highest high (HIGH) and lowest low (LOW) over a specific number of previous high and lows (H and L).
  • Calculation:
        HIGH = Highest(H1, H2, H3, H4, ... Hn)     LOW = Lowest(L1, L2, L3, L4, ... Ln)
  • Example:
        HIGH = Highest(100, 105, 103, 104, 105) = 105     LOW = Lowest(96, 98, 97, 98, 99) = 96

Trading Use

As with other volatility indicators, and especially channel indicators, the donchian channel is usually used to identify a break out of a price range, or a continuation of a price range. For example, when prices break outside of the donchian channel, a possible break out might occur, but when prices are contained within a donchian channel a possible reversal might occur.

Donchian channels are not usually smoothed, so they react immediately to changes in the highest high and lowest low. This means that prices will rarely be outside a donchian channel, even during a break out of a price range, because the donchian channel will move to the new high or low on the next bar or candlestick. The example chart shows a price range followed by a break out of the price range, but as described above, the prices are primarily contained within the donchian channel.




From: GIREESH BABU at 01:20 PM - Oct 27, 2013( )


Elliott Waves

Description

Elliott Waves are a chart analysis method that was developed by Ralph Elliott in the 1930s. Elliott Waves are not a technical indicator (as the MACD is), nor a type of chart (as Heikin Ashi is), but are a way of analysing candlestick and bar charts to determine the expected direction of a market.

Elliott Waves are based upon the theory that markets move in waves (alternating between bullish and bearish), and that these waves can be predicted (somewhat). Specifically, Elliott Waves propose that markets move with five waves in the primary direction (i.e. long in a bullish market, and short in a bearish market) and three waves in the secondary direction (i.e. the opposite direction). In addition, Elliott Waves propose that the same pattern (five waves and then three waves) is repeated in every time frame (e.g. minutes, hours, days, weeks, etc.), and are therefore considered to be a form of fractal (i.e. exhibiting self similar properties at every level).

Elliott Waves are also related to the Fibonacci numbers, in that the five and three waves are both part of the Fibonacci sequence, and that full primary and secondary waves include eighty-nine and fifty-five smaller waves respectively, which are also both part of the Fibonacci sequence. Ralph Elliott claimed that this relationship was only discovered after Elliott Waves had been designed (i.e. Elliott Waves were not purposely designed to have a relationship with the Fibonacci numbers).

In the example chart, the primary and secondary Elliott Waves are shown on a bar chart by the yellow and blue lines respectively.

Calculation

  • Description: Elliott Waves are not calculated at all (in the usual indicator sense), but are analysed according to specific criteria that define the location of each wave in relation to the previous and following waves. The analysis criteria can include the order of the waves, the distances that each wave moves, and the volume of each wave. A complete description of the analysis criteria is available in my Elliott Wave analysis discussion.

Trading Use

Elliott Waves are used to determine the direction and distance that a market is expected to move. The theory being that once the current wave has been identified, the wave pattern can be followed and trades made accordingly. For example, an Elliott Wave trader that determines that a market is currently completing the fifth wave in a bullish market, might prepare to make a short trade and expect to hold their short trade for three waves. The difficulty with Elliott Wave based trading is knowing which wave the market is currently making (if any), and two different Elliott Wave analysts can easily interpret the same chart differently, with different resulting trades.

In the example chart, an Elliott Wave trader that trades with the primary wave might enter a trade on the third and/or fifth waves of the yellow line, while an Elliott Wave trader that trades with the secondary wave might enter a trade on the third wave of the blue line.




From: GIREESH BABU at 01:25 PM - Oct 27, 2013( )


Elliott Waves' Analysis Criteria

Elliott Waves are a form of technical analysis, but they are not a technical indicator (in the sense of the CCI, etc.). Elliott Waves are a method of analysing bar or candlestick charts to determine the direction (and to some extent the distance) that a market is expected to move next.

A complete description of Elliott Waves is available in my definition of Elliott Waves, and includes information about the different types of waves, the number of waves that are required, and the relationship between Elliott Waves and the Fibonacci numbers.

Elliott Waves' Analysis Criteria

Elliott Waves are defined using several analysis criteria such as the relationship between waves, the location of each wave within the larger waves, and the volume that is included in each wave. The analysis criteria are flexible, meaning the criteria are not absolute, and their use and interpretation will vary from one Elliott Waves trader to another.

  • Primary Wave - The primary wave is the wave that is in agreement with the overall direction of the market (i.e. an upward wave in a bullish market, and a downward wave in a bearish market), and consists of five smaller waves that are defined as follows:

    • Wave # 1 - The first wave of a new primary wave is often very difficult to recognize in advance, but much easier to recognize in hindsight. There are no particular location or size requirements for the first wave, but once the wave has been recognized, it should be significant enough to be the start of a new primary wave (e.g. perhaps moving past a previous low).
    • Wave # 2 - The second wave of a primary move is a corrective wave (i.e. its direction is against the direction of the primary wave). The second wave should pull back into the first wave, to approximately the 61.8% Fibonacci retracement level, and should never exceed the high (for a bearish primary wave) or the low (for a bullish primary wave) of the first wave. The volume of the second wave should be lower than the volume of the first wave.
    • Wave # 3 - The third wave of a primary wave is in agreement with the direction of the primary wave, and is often the largest wave of the primary wave. The third wave should exceed the high (for a bullish primary wave) or the low (for a bearish primary wave) of the first wave, and should move to approximately the 161.8% Fibonacci extension level. The volume of the third wave should be higher than the previous two waves, and is often (but not necessarily) the highest volume wave of the primary wave.
    • Wave # 4 - The fourth wave of a primary wave is the second corrective wave of the primary wave (wave # 2 being the first). The fourth wave should pull back into the third wave, to approximately the 31.2% to 61.8% Fibonacci retracement levels, and should never exceed the high (for a bearish primary wave) or the low (for a bullish primary wave) of the second wave. The volume of the fourth wave should be lower than the volume of the third wave.
    • Wave # 5 - The fifth and final wave of a primary wave is in agreement with the direction of the primary wave, and has the potential to be the largest wave of the primary wave (wave # 3 being the other potentially largest wave), but can also be one of the smallest waves of the primary wave. The fifth wave should exceed the high (for a bullish primary wave) or the low (for a bearish primary wave), but the volume of the fifth wave can be either higher or lower than the volume of the third wave.
  • Secondary Wave - The secondary wave is the wave that is against the overall direction of the market (i.e. a downward wave in a bullish market, and an upward wave in a bearish market), and consists of three smaller waves that are defined as follows:

    • Wave # 1 - The first wave of a secondary wave is often very difficult to recognize in advance because it can easily be confused with another corrective wave (i.e. the sixth wave) of a primary wave. The first wave should pull back into the fifth wave of the previous primary wave, and while there are no particular size requirements for the first wave, it is preferred if the first wave reaches the 31.2% to 61.8% Fibonacci retracement levels.
    • Wave # 2 - The second wave of a secondary wave is a corrective wave (i.e. its direction is against the direction of the secondary wave). The second wave should pull back into the first wave, but should never exceed the high (for a bearish secondary wave) or the low (for a bullish secondary wave) of the first wave. The volume of the second wave should be lower than the volume of the first wave.
    • Wave # 3 - The third and final wave of a secondary wave is in agreement with the direction of the secondary wave. The third wave has the potential to be the largest wave of the secondary wave. The third wave should exceed the high (for a bullish secondary wave) or the low (for a bearish secondary wave) of the first wave, and should move to approximately the 161.8% Fibonacci extension level. The volume of the third wave should be higher than the volume of the first two waves.

Example Chart and Elliott Waves

The example chart is a bar chart with the primary (bearish) wave shown by the yellow line, and the secondary (bullish) wave shown by the blue line.




From: GIREESH BABU at 01:27 PM - Oct 27, 2013( )


Fibonacci Numbers

Description

The Fibonacci numbers are a series of numbers that correspond to a mathematical principle known as the golden ratio. The Fibonacci numbers were introduced to Europe in 1202 by Leonardo of Pisa (also later known as Leonardo Fibonacci). The Fibonacci numbers are said to appear throughout the natural world, including the branching of trees, pineapples, and the structure of pine cones. There are several different methods of trading that use the Fibonacci numbers, and they are usually displayed on the same chart as the price bars. The example chart (view full size chart) shows the Fibonacci numbers being used in a Fibonacci retracement trading system.

Calculation

  • Description: The Fibonacci numbers (F) are a series of numbers where the next number is the sum of the previous two numbers.
  • Calculation:
        Fn = Fn-1 + Fn-2
  • Sequence:
        1 1 2 3 5 8 13 21 34 55 89 ...

Trading Use

The Fibonacci numbers are used in many different trading systems, including Fibonacci Retracements, Arcs, and Fans. Whichever trading system is used, the Fibonacci numbers are usually used to calculate support and resistance points. For example, Fibonacci Retracements expect that during a trend, the price will move against the trend (retrace) back to a level identified by the Fibonacci numbers, and then continue the trend in the original direction. The Fibonacci numbers also have relationships with non Fibonacci trading systems, such as Elliott Waves, which were created before they were discovered to include the Fibonacci numbers.




From: GIREESH BABU at 01:29 PM - Oct 27, 2013( )


Force Index

Description

The force index is a technical analysis indicator, that calculates the strength of a price change using a combination of the prices and the volume. The force index is displayed as a single line that oscillates above and below zero, and it therefore looks similar to other oscillating indicators such as the Commodity Channel Index. However, the force index is different from most indicators in that it uses the price change, the direction of the price change, and the volume. The force index is displayed on its own chart (separate from the price bars), and is the lower section of the example chart.

Calculation

  • Description: The force index (FI) is calculated using the most recent closing price (Cn), the previous closing price (Cn-1), and the most recent volume (Vn).
  • Calculation:
        FI = (Cn - Cn-1) * Vn
  • Example:
        FI = (1.2508 - 1.2489) * 15004 = 28.5706

Trading Use

The force index is a measure of whether the buyers or sellers are in control of a particular market. In general, if the price is moving upwards, and the force index is above zero and rising (i.e. showing that the buyers are stronger than the sellers), then the upwards price movement is likely to continue. However, if the price is moving upwards, but the force index is at or moving towards zero, the buyers and sellers are becoming equal, so the upwards price movement is likely to stall temporarily or stop completely. The reverse of each of these scenarios is true for downwards price movements.

As the force index can be quite jagged (as seen in the example chart), it is often smoothed by a moving average. Short term moving averages of the force index are usually used for short term trading (i.e. day trading), while longer term moving averages of the force index are used for medium and long term trading (i.e. swing and position trading).




From: GIREESH BABU at 01:32 PM - Oct 27, 2013( )


Heikin Ashi

Description

Heikin Ashi is a type of trading chart that originated in Japan (heikin ashi translates as average bar). Heikin Ashi charts are similar to candlestick and bar charts in that they show similar information (the open, high, low, and close of the time frame), but Heikin Ashi charts calculate the information differently. Heikin Ashi charts are usually displayed as candlestick charts (i.e. where the color of the candlestick denotes the direction), but they can just as easily be displayed as bar charts (i.e. where the location of the open and close denote the direction). Heikin Ashi charts are usually used in place of a standard candlestick or bar chart, but can also be displayed in addition to the standard chart (i.e. as an indicator). In the example chart, the standard candlestick chart is shown in the upper section, and the Heikin Ashi chart is shown in the lower section.

Calculation

  • Description: Heikin Ashi charts calculate their own open (HAO), high (HAH), low (HAL), and close (HAC), using the actual open (O), high (H), low (L), and close (C), of the time frame (e.g. the open, high, low, and close, of each five minues).
  • Calculation:
        HAO = (HAO-1 + HAC-1) / 2
        HAC = (O + H + L + C) / 4
        HAH = Highest(H, HAO, HAC)
        HAL = Lowest(L, HAO, HAC)

Trading Use

Heikin Ashi charts are used in trading in the same manner as standard candlestick or bar charts (i.e. chart patterns are used to indicate price movements). However, Heikin Ashi charts have an additional aspect in that the direction of the bar (i.e. its color for candlesticks) is supposed to indicate the overall direction of the market, while ignoring the intermediate direction (e.g. false changes of direction).

In the example chart, the standard candlesticks (the upper section) change direction (i.e. color) quite often even though the price is still moving in the same overall direction. The Heikin Ashi candlesticks (the lower section) change direction (i.e. color) less often, indicating that the price is still moving in the same direction.




From: GIREESH BABU at 01:35 PM - Oct 27, 2013( )


Market Profile

New Thread: Human Maturity – Ego Immaturity

Gireesh Babu at 09:03 PM - Oct 21, 2013 ( )

GOOD ARTICLE - MUST READ

Usually when we think of maturity, we think of growing up – becoming an adult. But, how many adults do we know that seem incapable of growing up?

The whole topic is an open invitation for the superego to have a field day.

When discussing human maturity it seems the first logical step is to discriminate what we mean by human maturity. Here we are not talking so much about the maturation of the body, the emotions or the mind – though the maturation of these human aspects are part of the process.

Ego maturity is more centrally involved, but ego maturity needs to be free of the constraints of parental and social standards. Real human maturity is not dependent on the superego or the personal “conscience” based on superego dictates.

Arrested development is a manifestation of ego immaturity. The psycho-dynamics of arrested development need to be addressed and the energies trapped within freed for the soul to move toward real human maturity.

Human maturity, as we are using it here, could be referred to as the “ripening of the soul.” Here human maturity is seen as the soul and the human being integrating and embodying not only the maturation of the body, mind and emotions, but also waking up to the underlying nature of reality.

Human maturity is then seen as a movement deeper into true nature or as an unfolding of the soul.

courtesy:-http://www.open-secrets.com/perceptions/human-maturity-ego-immaturity/



From: GIREESH BABU at 09:25 PM - Oct 21, 2013( )


How to Heal and Mature Your Ego into an Ally
You must develop your spiritual nature in order to mature the ego into an Adult. The characteristic of the ego at this stage is that of waking up from the trance addiction to uncover its spiritual nature. The adult ego unlike the lesser evolved ego, reunites with its inner power to access the wisdom, creativity and truth from within. The adult ego is born out of seeing the truth within its own delusions.

When the ego can honestly think, feel and say, “I am Enough” it is functioning from a mature expression. Knowing you are enough, isn’t a position of arrogance, it doesn’t mean you feel ‘better than’ others. Embodying the truth that “I am Enough” isn’t a statement of superiority or inferiority, it is the simple truth. Feeling “I am enough” is like finally being able to exhale after 40 years of holding your breath. It quickly becomes a surrendering to the goodness, truth, and beauty of who you really are. This is the exhilaration of waking up and reuniting with your truer self.

When you heal and mature your ego, your life begins to transform. The way you view the world shifts and lifts to a higher octave. You simply drop the suffocating anxiety of pretending you’re not good enough and quickly bond with your divine potential. You discover that you are secure, creative, connected, loving, confident, intuitive, and wise—enough. This enough-ness comes from within. You no longer try to “take” or “get” your enough-ness from your relationships with others, your career, or the amount of money you have in the bank. This knowledge becomes internal and it changes everything.

The adult ego owns these concepts and begins to bring this ‘enough-ness’ into their daily lives. The adult ego functions from this ‘enough-ness’ within relationships, on the job, and during creative projects. There is no more wasted effort of trying to get that sense of being enough from outer sources.

Changing the Course of Your Future
Awareness leads to understanding. However, there are two expressions of understanding: 1) the understanding of our mind (intellect), and 2) the understanding of our heart (caring). When we understand from our heart, we open the door to compassion. Compassion is the way to help our ego mature into a spiritually empowered adult ego. Remember this simple truth; our ego seeks to be understood, our Soul seeks to be understanding.

The immature ego does not recognize truth and therefore always lies. Its measures everything only through the five physical senses and has difficulty measuring or valuing anything metaphysical. Every human being is metaphysical by nature. Its valuable to learn what it means to ‘be‘ metaphysical.

Exploring Your Metaphysical and Spiritual Potential
Metaphysical (Beyond the Physical): Meta means ‘beyond’; Physical—the physical.

Metaphysics isn’t a ‘New Age’ concept it is the nature of every human being. What is metaphysical about us? Our spiritual nature (Soul and Spirit) our relationship with the Divine. Our mind is completely metaphysical because it is made up of the beliefs, attitudes, thoughts, feelings, choices, and decisions we make every day of our lives. The immature ego has a difficult time understanding the most important parts of our reality; our metaphysical nature.

For instance the immature ego doesn’t know how to forgive and would rather seek revenge. Forgiveness is a spiritual quality and comes from our Soul. Jesus taught people to forgive, when you are in a place of forgiveness you are functioning from your Soul, your spiritual nature, not your ego. Forgiveness is a metaphysical concept.

Our metaphysical nature is the most important part of us, because when we change our metaphysical reality then our physical reality changes as well. Our physical reality is an expression and reflection of our metaphysical consciousness.

Regardless of our biological age, our mental-emotional state can be stuck in any one of five immature stages of ego development. By understanding the ego we can begin to approach it with compassion and respect. It can begin to heal and mature and evolve into a spiritually empowered adult.

Adult Ego. The adult ego knows it is enough. It isn’t perfect or ‘better than’ but it feels and functions in life from a place of ‘enough-ness’. The grown-up ego usually hits a crisis point where it must surrender to the Divine. Feeling completely lost and hopeless the grown-up ego finally stops trying and asks for healing from God-Goddess. The immature ego is right, it isn’t enough. When we discover our spiritual nature and consciously align with our Soul we receive love; a love that heals and matures the underdeveloped ego. To succeed in life, to be ‘safe’ in life you need to connect with your Soul and Spirit. This connection allows you to gain access to inner wisdom, discernment, creativity, passion, and the intuition of your metaphysical and divine nature.

The price we must pay to evolve beyond the grown-up ego and become a spiritually empowered adult is to recognize we are enough. We can only feel ‘I’m enough’ once we become conscious of our Divine nature. Like in the Wizard of Oz, the way Dorothy always had the power to return Home, so do we. Dorothy’s journey was to find the great Wizard where she quickly discovered his illusion of being powerful. She was terrorized by the witch. She listened to all of her friends ‘if only’s...’, ‘If only I had a brain, heart, courage, etc’. The story of the Wizard of Oz is so powerful and popular because it tells the story of our spiritual journey in life.

We must heal and mature our ego and the only way to do that is to approach the ego with compassion. To be compassionate we must develop our spiritual nature. When we look through the eyes of the Soul, we are able to discover the love that heals and understands the limited self (ego). Through this understanding we can begin to help the grown-up ego mature into an adult ego and reach a place of inner peace.

The adult ego is the rarest stage of ego maturity. Few people ever mature their ego to the adult stage. Many people in their sixties and seventies are still in a state of arrested development stuck at the infant or child ego stage. These are the individuals who eye the biggest piece of pie at the cafeteria and always making sure they ‘get enough.’ This is the infant ego’s greed, “I need to get the biggest and the best for myself.”



From: GIREESH BABU at 09:30 PM - Oct 21, 2013( )


Ten Characteristics of a Spiritually Empowered Adult Ego:

1. Enjoys exploring the world of complex answers. It takes time to think and feel for itself. It knows that the emotional nature is complex. The adult ego will spend time learning and understanding how our emotions function and discover the lost power hidden there. The healed adult ego knows that ease is found within complexity and doesn’t seek only the “simple answers.”

2. Moves beyond judgment and criticism into compassion and understanding. The mature ego consciously discerns and evaluates life rather than labeling and judging it. It makes room for a the possibility of some gray area. The adult ego is not fixated on black or white and is more than capable of thinking and understanding within the realm of ‘gray.’

3. Knows it is worthy of receiving help and feels gratitude toward others. The adult ego wants to share the credit and to work together. It knows that it has limited time and resources and that there are other people who can do things better. The mature ego owns its strengths and knows that there are skills it owns and skills that others may have are better than its own. The mature ego realizes that if someone else is doing something ‘better than you,’ it doesn’t actually make them a better person than you. The adult ego doesn’t feel threatened and is willing to receive help.

4. Functions with humility. It looks at each person and event without projecting the past experiences onto the current reality. It allows for people to change. To have humility is to see things as if for the first time, with fresh eyes. Not to assume you “know it all” but to be willing to learn something new from this experience.

5. Focuses on being trustworthy. Do you follow through with what you promise yourself you’re going to do, or do you break promises all the time, looking for excuses to avoid responsibility? To build self-trust, we must develop our strength of character, to mean what you say and say what you mean.

6. Looks for ways to love and give to others and life. It feels blessed and wants to share its good fortune with others. It isn’t concerned with keeping score. It enjoys the reward of being a loving, caring, and giving person. The adult ego is able to give freely not always expecting something in return. The mature ego knows how to fully accept and appreciate love that is reciprocated.

7. Respects and honors differences. In so doing, the mature ego respects its own uniqueness and knows that it is inherently valuable to all life. It doesn’t question or doubt that it belongs in life and knows it’s an important expression of God-Goddess’ uniqueness made physical.

8. Spends time in solitude, meditation, and self-reflection. The mature ego connects with the present moment by being sensual; conscious of the physical sensations of the moment. It tastes the food it eats and feels the warmth of the sun as it walks down the street. This mature ego lives in the present moment and feels the connection with the Divine.

9. Develops the qualities of caring, intimacy and love. It has redefined the limited past definitions of what love is and has developed mature and healthy relationships that start with love for self which then expands to others. It focuses upon being understanding more than being understood.

10. Explores and delights in the mysteries of the metaphysical. It seeks to understand the nature of the mind and values its qualities. It monitors its intentions and what it pays attention to. Knowing the power of the imagination, it uses these tools to create a better life. It thinks with originality and experiences

Four Techniques to Harness and Mature Your Ego:

1. Understand Your Arrogance. Arrogance is two sides of the same coin. The “better than” position is easy to understand. The other position isn’t as easy to see, it is the “less than” position of arrogance.

Both positions, “better than” and “less than” are a form of arrogance. The truth is you are a valuable human being no matter what. Your ego has convinced itself of its insignificance by denying the truth of its spiritual nature and refusing to own its true value. God-Goddess; your Soul-Spirit knows you are a valuable and worthy expression of life, yet your immature ego refuses to accept that. The foolish immature ego is saying that God-Goddess is wrong! I am worthless, not good enough. It is pure arrogance to pretend you know better than God-Goddess. It is the inverse ‘arrogance’ of being “less than.”

2. Move from Judgment into Discernment. Love opens the heart to understand, understanding leads to compassion. Compassion is the opposite of arrogance. It is the understanding and compassionate expression of love that heals and our ego mature.

Judgment separates us from love and leads to imprisonment of arrogance. Be conscious of judgments of self and others. It takes maturity to open your heart to seek greater compassionate understanding and give yourself the benefit of the doubt. Stop criticizing yourself and start loving yourself. This exercise is to make a list of people you judge. Then write down why you are urged to do this. Is it a way for you to feel superior or ‘better than’ them? If so recognize what you’re doing and forgive yourself.Guided meditations can help you to make deep changes in your mind.

3. Simplicity versus Complexity. Grown-ups who insist on everything being simple, are the people who struggle the most in life. There is a paradox of simplicity that states; the more you allow yourself and your life to be complex, the easier your life becomes. When you insist that life be simple, you are functioning in your immature ego and your life can quickly become very difficult to live. Our Soul is complex but the ego wants everything to be simple.

A good example of this can be seen in the Church. When the “rules” of the elders were put into law question about the sexual nature the priests such as: When does a Priest have sexual relations if he doesn’t get married? These were just too complicated to think about. It was much simpler to just say that priests abstain from all sexual behavior. That was the easy answer and one that has led to a difficult (if not impossible) reality. Look at the mess this “simple answer” has created in the Catholic Church today.

When you stop trying to make life simple and allow for it to be complex, you’re moving into the truth of living life. The truth will set you free. Complexity doesn’t mean difficult! It means intricate, detailed, or having many aspects or factors to consider.

Ever try to program a VCR? Oh that’s too much to figure out. Let’s just hit record when we want to record something and shut it off when we are done. Simple. Yet if you let yourself enter into the chaos and complexity and actually read the manual to figure it out you can program your VCR to record shows in the middle of the night or while you’re on vacation. This can add elegance and ease to living life. Strangely enough accepting complexity can lead to an easier existence. That is if you’ll allow yourself to be challenged by complexity instead of frozen.

The spiritual empowered adult loves the challenge of complexity. What is complex is fun and draws out greater strength and empowerment. We came into life to challenge ourselves, not to shut down and do what we’ve always done. Learn to find the joy of challenge and be willing to enter the magical realms of the chaos of complexity.

This depth of feeling can shift and lift its own understanding and attitudes. The state of complexity is accepted by those who are concerned with learning how to change.

4. Journal Work. Answer the following questions:
a. Do you feel better than or less than others?
What makes you “better than” other people?
What makes you feel “less than” others?
What is your Ego’s fantasy of personal destruction?
How would you think and feel if you knew that you were whole, complete, and enough just as you are?

Soul-utions Challenge:
Seek to break the habit of trying to be understood by everyone. Instead focus on being understanding.

Rent the movie the Wizard of Oz and see if you can recognize story’s parallels to the spiritual truths about the journey Home to your empowered and spiritual nature.

Make a list of 5 close friends and write down the qualities they possess of the mature ego. In person or by email express to them how much you appreciate these qualities of their personality. Look to see if the positive qualities you see in them are also within you. Journal about your new understanding of the characteristics of the adult ego.

COURTESY : http://www.selfgrowth.com

New Thread: WISH YOU AND YOUR BELOWED ONES A HAPPY BAKRA IED

Gireesh Babu at 05:39 PM - Oct 15, 2013 ( )



From: GIREESH BABU at 08:13 AM - Oct 16, 2013( )


Eid ul adha is eid of sacrifice, and commitment to Allahs orders , May Allah bless us with the same in all circles of life , and help all amongst us , who r helpless , worried , and waiting for his rehmat , Ameen . Eid Mubarak.

New Thread: WISH YOU AND YOUR BELOWED ONES A HAPPY DASARA

Gireesh Babu at 11:25 AM - Oct 13, 2013 ( )

New Thread: = NIFTY FOR LIVING = ( GIREESH BABU )

Gireesh Babu at 04:23 PM - Oct 11, 2013 ( )

"ALL ALWAYS BE HEALTHY AND WEALTHY"

(15 NIFTY POINTS / DAY)

<<<<<<<<<<<>>>>>>>>>>>



From: GIREESH BABU at 08:37 PM - Oct 13, 2013( )


GUIDENCE  FOR  TRADING  AS  PER  THIS THREAD : -

  • 1. ALWAYS TRADE ONLY ONE LOT .
  • 2. ALWAYS PLACE 15 POINTS AS TARGET FROM THE GIVEN ENTRY POINT , STOP LOSS AS PER UPDATION WHEN TRADE IS ACTIVE .
  • 3. STRICTLY  FOLLOW  ALL OUR  MESSAGES  WITHOUT  DELAY.

 

DISCLAIMER :- Do not base your investment / trading decision on information from this thread and website.

 

=== ALL THE BEST ===


New Thread: HAPPY ONAM TO ALL ESPECIALLY TO MALAYALEES & KERALITES

Gireesh Babu at 10:34 PM - Sep 14, 2013 ( )

 

New Thread: MY NIFTY / BANKNIFTY TRADES & VIEWS

Gireesh Babu at 06:51 PM - Sep 10, 2013 ( )

"ALL ALWAYS BE HEALTHY AND WEALTHY"

DO YOUR OWN ANALYSIS BEFORE TAKING ANY TRADING AND INVESTMENT DECISIONS.

WISHING YOU ALL A PROFITABLE TRADING DAY



From: GIREESH BABU at 02:33 PM - Sep 18, 2013( )


MY PROFIT BOOKING HABIT :-

SCRIPT FIRST BOOKING LEVEL SECOND BOOKING LEVEL FINAL BOOKING LEVEL
NIFTY    15 POINTS - TSL BALANCE AT COST  

   30 POINTS - TSL BALANCE AT COST  

50 POINTS
BANKNIFTY 30 POINTS - TSL BALANCE AT COST 60 POINTS - TSL BALANCE AT COST 100 POINTS

New Thread: NIFTY-BANKNIFTY WEEKLY SUPPORT AND RESSISTANCE LEVELS

Gireesh Babu at 10:41 PM - Sep 01, 2013 ( )

NIFTY AND BANKNIFTY WEEKLY IMPORTANT SUPPORT AND RESISTANCE LEVELS



From: GIREESH BABU at 11:02 PM - Sep 01, 2013( )


ALL SPOT LEVELS

New Thread: CRUDEOIL FUTURE GANN SQUARE OF 9 - BUY AND SELL LEVELS

Gireesh Babu at 09:16 PM - Sep 01, 2013 ( )

MCX - CRUDEOIL

I WILL TRY TO UPDATE GANN SQUARE OF NINE - BUY AND SELL LEVELS FOR INTRADAY TRADING

ALL LEVELS ARE FUTURE LEVELS BASED ON CLOSING PRICE OF LAST TRADING DAY



From: GIREESH BABU at 08:39 PM - Nov 11, 2013( )


HOW TO TRADE USING GANN LEVELS ?

AS PER MY OBSERVATION , BETTER TO TRADE WITH 2 LOTS MINIMUM . IF CRUDEOIL IS TRADING BELOW BUY LEVEL OR ABOVE SELL LEVEL AT ANY POINT OF TIME , IF IT TRADES EITHER BUY OR SELL LEVEL , TAKE POSITION ACCORDING TO OUR LEVELS . AND PLACE STOP LOSS ORDER ALSO.  BOOK 1 LOT PROFIT AT FIRST TARGET ITSELF AND PLACE STOP LOSS ORDER FOR THE BALANCE LOT AT JUST 2 POINTS ABOVE OUR BUY PRICE . IF SECOND TARGET ACHIEVED BOOK PROFIT FOR 1 LOT IF YOU ARE TRADING  MORE THAN 2 LOTS . THEN PLACE STOP LOSS ORDER AT JUST 2 POINTS ABOVE OF FIRST TARGET. AND SO ON REVISE YOUR STOP LOSS TILL COMPLETE THE TRADE . AND FOR SELL SIDE VICE VERSA . ALWAYS TRADE WITHOUT EMOTIONS AND TRADE ALL OPORTINITIES WITHOUT FAIL . JUST CALCULATE YOUR PROFIT / LOSS AT THE END OF WEEK ONLY .

New Thread: NIFTY & BANKNIFTY GANN SQUARE OF 9 - BUY AND SELL LEVEL

Gireesh Babu at 04:21 PM - Sep 01, 2013 ( )

 

NIFTY AND BANKNIFTY

I WILL TRY TO UPDATE GANN SQUARE OF NINE - BUY AND SELL LEVELS FOR INTRADAY TRADING



From: GIREESH BABU at 04:46 PM - Sep 01, 2013( )


ALL LEVELS ARE SPOT LEVELS BASED ON CLOSING PRICE OF LAST TRADING DAY



From: GIREESH BABU at 11:10 PM - Sep 04, 2013( )


ALL LEVELS ARE FUTURE LEVELS BASED ON CLOSING PRICE OF LAST TRADING DAY

New Thread: HAPPY INDEPENDENCE DAY - SALUTE TO MAHATMA JI

Gireesh Babu at 12:00 PM - Aug 15, 2013 ( )

New Thread: Digestive System Diseases

Gireesh Babu at 11:50 AM - Aug 04, 2013 ( )

Including Digestive System Functions

Digestive system diseases are more common than most people know. Understanding digestive system functions will help you find the right remedies. Find out about the functions of the digestive system.

It has been said you are what you eat, but when your stomach gets off-track it causes all manner of discomfort.

However, most often a change (or improvement) in diet and exercise can help your digestive function. Reducing stress, slowing down as you eat, and paying attention to the combination of foods that you ingest are all basic areas to focus on.

Common digestive system diseases are quite varied, depending on a person’s lifestyle, eating habits, exercise etc.

Understanding digestive disease, however, begins with a look at the overall digestive system anatomy and activities.

The Basics of Digestive System Functions

The digestive system has a very specialized task – namely taking the foods and beverages you consume and breaking them into nutrients and waste products. It’s a fairly sophisticated piece of machinery that starts at your mouth and ends at the anus.

Digestive System

Let’s take a brief look at each of the functions of the digestive system:

  • Mouth: Your saliva has enzymes that begin the process of breaking down food, as does chewing.
  • Esophagus: This muscle bound tube moves food from your mouth to your stomach.
  • Stomach: A food processing plant, your stomach mixes your consumed items with more enzymes and breaks them down further.
  • Small Intestine: This is the next stop for broken down food where it will be mixed with digestive secretions. This is the point at which your blood receives the nutrients from what you’ve consumed.
  • Pancreas: The enzymes from this organ break down carbohydrates, fat and protein in order to make insulin.
  • Liver: Your liver helps digest fat, helps clean out harmful chemicals, and transforms the broken down food into what the body needs for daily functioning.
  • Gallbladder: The secretions from the gallbladder help digest fat.
  • Large Intestine: This is your body’s waste disposal system.
  • Rectum: This region is responsible for telling your brain when you have waste products to eliminate.
  • Anus: This controls the release of waste.

Throughout the digestive process a lot can go wrong; that is how digestive system diseases develop.

Common Digestive System Diseases

There are many diseases of the digestive system. One that’s sometimes tied to diabetes is Crohn’s disease. Crohn’s causes inflammation in the digestive track that leads to stomach pain, waning appetite and often diarrhea.

  • Natural Old Home Remedies: People suffering from Crohn’s are advised to take supplemental Vitamins A, C, and E to help ease the symptoms. Herbs like cardamom and chamomile are also recommended to calm the intestine.

A second digestive malady is called Irritable Bowl Syndrome (IBS). The difficulty manifests in repeated cycles of constipation and diarrhea accompanied with listlessness. Various things contribute to the development of IBS including stress, allergies and the lack of fiber.

  • Natural Old Home Remedies: Recommendations for IBS sufferers include drinking plenty of water and taking Vitamins B, C, and E.

A third common condition that is related to the digestive system is hemorrhoids. When the veins in the rectum or anus swell (often from pushing during constipation), they may pop out or bleed. Needless to say, this is very uncomfortable. A lot of over-the-counter products work quite well for hemorrhoids. However, if this is a recurring or longer-term problem, visit your doctor for advice. If left untreated, hemorrhoids can become a more serious issue.

  • Natural Old Home Remedies: Eat a fiber rich diet, drink lots of water, exercise regularly and use a magnesium supplement.

In addition to these three common digestive system problems, a surprisingly large number of people also frequently suffer from indigestion, diarrhea, heartburn and constipation. Natural cures for indigestionheartburn, diarrhea and constipation have been around for many years. Probiotics can provide relief for these problems. You can find more information on probiotic supplements here.

Digestive Supplements:

DigestAssist is a great product that promotes healthy digestion and comfort after meals.

The health benefits include support of digestive comfort after meals, maintenance of healthy levels of stomach acid during digestion, and providing on-the-spot support for healthy digestion.

If the natural remedies don’t work, try DigestAssist to help your digestive system.

There are also excellent herbal digestive supplements that help promote digestive harmony naturally; herbs for digestion have been used successfully for hundreds of years.

 Summary:

This is a very brief review of some common digestive system diseases; as well as a review of how your digestive system works. If you’re experiencing on-going problems, it’s advisable to seek out proper medical care and diagnosis as digestive problems can indicate other serious disorders.

 

Home Remedies for Colon Cleansing

The colon, a part of the digestive system is responsible for extracting water and salt from the solid wastes prior to release. At times the colon does not function properly and causes a build-up of harmful toxins along the colon walls. This can cause headache, skin allergy, low energy level, vomiting, bloating and so on. If proper precaution is not taken on time then it can even lead to various diseases and illness such as heart diseases, gall bladder stones, asthma, skin allergies, and liver ailments. However, with the help of colon cleansing you can easily get rid of harmful toxins.

There are many treatments available for color cleansing. But the best options for colon cleansing are the natural and simple home remedies which you can easily try at home. At the same time, these natural solutions are safe and do not have side effects.

Here are top 10 home remedies for Colon Cleansing.

  1. Apple Juice

    Fresh apple juice is one of the best home treatments for colon cleansing. Regular intake of apple juice encourages bowel movements, breaks down toxins and improves the health of liver as well as the digestive system. Start your day with one glass of unfiltered apple juice and then after half an hour drink one glass of water. Throughout the day follow this routine several times. In between you can also drink one glass of prune juice. Freshly squeezed apple juice should be used to get good results, but if it is not available then you can use organic apple juice. When following this remedy it is advisable to avoid solid foods.

  2. Lemon Juice

    Lemon has antioxidant properties and its high vitamin C content is good for the digestive system. Hence for colon cleansing you can try lemon juice. Take the juice of one lemon and add a pinch of sea-salt, little honey and one glass of lukewarm water to it. Mix all the ingredients properly and drink this solution on an empty stomach in the morning. This will help you to enjoy more energy, better bowel movement and better skin condition. During the day time you can add two tablespoon of

New Thread: GOLDGUINEA POSITIONAL SYSTEMATIC TRADES

Gireesh Babu at 11:20 PM - Aug 02, 2013 ( )

DEAR FRIENDS ,

THIS THREAD IS FOR SYSTEMATIC POSITIONAL TRADING IN GOLD GUINEA . I AM TRADING POSITIONAL AS PER THIS METHOD .

THIS METHOD WILL BE USEFUL WHO HAVE SMALL CAPITAL IN COMMODITY TRADING ACCOUNT AND NO TIME TO WATCH THE MARKET WHOLE DAY. I WILL POST WHEN I AM TRADING GOLDGUINEA IN MY ACCOUNT AS PER THIS METHOD.

MAKE YOUR OWN ANALYSIS BEFORE MAKING ANY TRADING OR INVESTMENT DECISIONS .

Threads by Gireesh Babu
TitleDate
BUY MCX - INTRADAY ONLY [2 ] Intraday Section 16 Jan, 2014
WISHING YOU ALL VERY VERY HAPPY NEW YEAR [1 ] General Discussion 01 Jan, 2014
AN APPEAL TO INDIAN VOTERS [16 ] General Discussion 04 Nov, 2013
WISHING YOU ALL HAPPY DIWALI [2 ] General Discussion 03 Nov, 2013
INSTANT GUIDE OF TECHNICAL INDICATORS - CANDLESTICKS [1 ] Learning Section 28 Oct, 2013
INSTANT GUIDE OF TECHNICAL INDICATORS-3 [3 ] Learning Section 27 Oct, 2013
INSTANT GUIDE OF TECHNICAL INDICATORS-2 [5 ] General Discussion 27 Oct, 2013
INSTANT GUIDE OF TECHNICAL INDICATORS [4 ] General Discussion 27 Oct, 2013
Human Maturity – Ego Immaturity [3 ] General Discussion 21 Oct, 2013
WISH YOU AND YOUR BELOWED ONES A HAPPY BAKRA IED [6 ] General Discussion 15 Oct, 2013
WISH YOU AND YOUR BELOWED ONES A HAPPY DASARA [5 ] General Discussion 13 Oct, 2013
= NIFTY FOR LIVING = ( GIREESH BABU ) [59 ] Intraday Section 11 Oct, 2013
HAPPY ONAM TO ALL ESPECIALLY TO MALAYALEES & KERALITES [12 ] General Discussion 14 Sep, 2013
MY NIFTY / BANKNIFTY TRADES & VIEWS [192 ] Futures & Options 10 Sep, 2013
NIFTY-BANKNIFTY WEEKLY SUPPORT AND RESSISTANCE LEVELS [2 ] Market Outlook 01 Sep, 2013
CRUDEOIL FUTURE GANN SQUARE OF 9 - BUY AND SELL LEVELS [158 ] Commodity Calls 01 Sep, 2013
NIFTY & BANKNIFTY GANN SQUARE OF 9 - BUY AND SELL LEVEL [136 ] Intraday Section 01 Sep, 2013
HAPPY INDEPENDENCE DAY - SALUTE TO MAHATMA JI [6 ] General Discussion 15 Aug, 2013
Digestive System Diseases [5 ] Healthcare Sector 04 Aug, 2013
GOLDGUINEA POSITIONAL SYSTEMATIC TRADES [13 ] Commodity Calls 02 Aug, 2013
BUY NIFTYBEES AND SELL OUT OF MONEY NIFTY OPTIONS [6 ] Futures & Options 23 Jul, 2013
NIFTY POSITIONAL PAPER TRADES - ONLY FOR LEARNING [1 ] Learning Section 21 Jul, 2013
NIFTY OPTIONS STRADDLE - LEARNING SECTION [5 ] Learning Section 20 Jul, 2013
BANK NIFTY POSITIONAL PAPER TRADES - ONLY FOR LEARNING [164 ] Learning Section 19 Jul, 2013
CRUDEOIL INTRADAY CALLS FOR 2013 - SYSTEMATIC TRADING [144 ] Commodity Calls 30 Jun, 2013
NIFTY INTRADAY CALLS FOR 2013 - SYSTEMATIC TRADING [162 ] Futures & Options 30 Jun, 2013
GOOD IMPROVEMENT - THANKS TO MUDRAA ADMIN [10 ] General Discussion 29 Jun, 2013
RISKY-(CRUDE-BUY) [11 ] Commodity Calls 21 Jun, 2013
RISKY-(CRUDE-BUY) [3 ] Commodity Calls 20 Jun, 2013
RISKY NIFTY OPTION - POSITIONAL [40 ] Futures & Options 11 Jun, 2013
HOW TO IMPROVE TRADING METHOD WITH MORE ACCURACY ? [19 ] General Discussion 08 Jun, 2013
STOCKS EQUITY CASH - INTRADAY ONLY [4 ] Intraday Section 06 Jun, 2013
RISKY-CRUDEOIL [5 ] Commodity Calls 05 Jun, 2013
COPPER - INTRADAY ONLY [13 ] Commodity Calls 05 Jun, 2013
NATURALGAS - INTRADAY ONLY [49 ] Commodity Calls 05 Jun, 2013
RISKY-(NATURALGAS-SELL) [3 ] Commodity Calls 04 Jun, 2013
(NATURALGAS-BUY) [21 ] Commodity Calls 04 Jun, 2013
NIFTY AND BANKNIFTY INTRADAY CALLS FOR JUNE 2013 [170 ] Futures & Options 04 Jun, 2013
(BANKNIFTY)-(03/06/2013) [6 ] Futures & Options 03 Jun, 2013
(NIFTY)-(03/06/2013) [14 ] Futures & Options 03 Jun, 2013
(CRUDEOIL-BTST)-(01/06/2013) [7 ] Commodity Calls 01 Jun, 2013
RISKY-(CRUDEOIL-BUY) [8 ] Commodity Calls 31 May, 2013
(GOLDM)-(31/05/2013) [4 ] Commodity Calls 31 May, 2013
COMMODITY MCX MARKET LOT SIZE [36 ] General Discussion 31 May, 2013
(COPPER)-(31/05/2013) [5 ] Commodity Calls 31 May, 2013
NATURALGAS-(31/05/2013) [24 ] Commodity Calls 31 May, 2013
(NIFTY)-(31/05/2013) [12 ] Futures & Options 31 May, 2013
RISKY-(CRUDEOIL-BUY) [16 ] Commodity Calls 30 May, 2013
(NIFTY)-(30/05/2013) [6 ] Futures & Options 30 May, 2013
RISKY-(CRUDEOIL-BUY) [40 ] Commodity Calls 29 May, 2013
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